TV Guide

Tue 21st February

Morning

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Tue 21st February

Noon

Man On Earth With Tony Robinson

Tony Robinson examines societies similar to our own, who not only survived climate change, but flourished. In Peru, the Hauri people embraced a savage drought, developed advanced techniques of water management and founded a great empire, itself the basis of the great Inca nation. In Europe, Tony learns how a mini-Ice Age triggered the Black Death; but rather than cripple medieval Europe it launched a period of unprecedented progression. The Industrial Revolution and globalisation were hastened by the benefits of a stable climate, but Tony also learns how this stability appears to be ending, bringing a new threat to human societies.

Tue 21st February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Tue 21st February

Tales of the Gun

For nearly 400 years following the inception of firearms in the 14th century, hitting a target with a gun was often a matter of luck - until the technological leap of cutting grooves in the barrel permitted the bullet to spin, thus providing gyroscopic stabilisation. This innovation sparked the evolution of the rifle, an evolution that began with the Pennsylvania rifle of the American Revolution. We'll review the rifle's history in the US, as well as contributions made by European designers.

Tue 21st February

Dogfights

May 10, 1972 - a day that would go down in history as the bloodiest day of the Vietnam air war. In the early morning hours of May 10th, Navy F-4 Phantom pilot Curt Dose and his back-seater Jim McDevitt streak towards North Vietnam with a powerful Alpha strike formation. Their target is the port city of Haiphong. Suddenly, Dose and Hawkins get a radio call...bandits. Dose quickly engages a MiG-21. He gets good tone on his Sidewinder missile and fires. Dose watches as the missile makes a final quick adjustment, then buries itself in the MiGs tail pipe. They go full afterburner, screaming out of the area at Mach 1.2. They streak over Kep airfield towards the coast.

Tue 21st February

Roman Britain from the Air

Christine Bleakley and Dr Michael Scott take to the skies to see what life was like for Romans and Britons 2000 years ago. London was created by the Romans and that can be seen more clearly from the air than on the ground, giving this film a very unique take on British history. In a novel journey across the UK, from London to Wales and then heading up north to the spectacular Hadrian's Wall, some of the secrets of everyday life in Roman Britain are uncovered; they came across 1800 year old hand cream, find a massive chunk of Roman Britain in an underground car park and visit a Roman toilet on the very edge of the Roman Empire.

Tue 21st February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the small village of Caerwent in Wales, one of the country's best preserved Roman sites. The archaeologists excavate a prime location that has previously been untouched, revealing a whole host of finds including a maze of walls and a villa.

Tue 21st February

Evening

Meet the Romans

Forsaking Emperors and battles but embracing the latest archaeological evidence, she reveals what went on behind closed doors and in the public baths. 2000 years ago, Rome was 'the' city, with heaving population of over one million. The average citizen's diaries and letters no longer exist - but their epitaphs and funerary monuments do - and they reveal the extraordinary biographies of the wives and children, the butchers and barman, the slaves and shopkeepers of this truly amazing city.

Tue 21st February

Pompeii: Cellar of Skeletons

Fifty-four strange, twisted skeletons - how did they die, but more importantly, how did they live? The biggest ever forensic investigation into skeletal remains in Pompeii is now underway - and the secrets of the rich and poor are revealed, from their sex lives, to their diet, to their extraordinary racial origins and the priceless treasures they were found with. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is examined as never before, including the massive earthquake which preceded it. After such a huge natural disaster, why did the people in the cellar ignore the warning signs and choose to stay in Pompeii? And in the face of impending disaster - with the ensuing looting and panic - how did they survive for so long? Presenter Don Wildman takes us on a forensic investigation that will change the way we see Pompeii forever.

Tue 21st February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Tue 21st February

Life In The War

In 1944, a week after the Allies' Normandy landings, Britain's period of relative calm is disrupted as Hitler strikes back with a terrifying new weapon - the V1 flying bomb.

Tue 21st February

Lest We Forget

This programme explores West Indian ex-servicemen and women who served in the British forces in both world wars. The personalities include a soldier who fought for the English regiment in WWII, a pilot who joined the ATS, plus other individuals who were in the ground crew in the RAF. The film traces the story of these individuals from those early war years through to Enoch Powell's era in 1968 when he requested these servicemen return to their home country.

Wed 22nd February

Morning

Tales of the Gun

For nearly 400 years following the inception of firearms in the 14th century, hitting a target with a gun was often a matter of luck - until the technological leap of cutting grooves in the barrel permitted the bullet to spin, thus providing gyroscopic stabilisation. This innovation sparked the evolution of the rifle, an evolution that began with the Pennsylvania rifle of the American Revolution. We'll review the rifle's history in the US, as well as contributions made by European designers.

Wed 22nd February

Dogfights

May 10, 1972 - a day that would go down in history as the bloodiest day of the Vietnam air war. In the early morning hours of May 10th, Navy F-4 Phantom pilot Curt Dose and his back-seater Jim McDevitt streak towards North Vietnam with a powerful Alpha strike formation. Their target is the port city of Haiphong. Suddenly, Dose and Hawkins get a radio call...bandits. Dose quickly engages a MiG-21. He gets good tone on his Sidewinder missile and fires. Dose watches as the missile makes a final quick adjustment, then buries itself in the MiGs tail pipe. They go full afterburner, screaming out of the area at Mach 1.2. They streak over Kep airfield towards the coast.

Wed 22nd February

Secrets of War

They were the top spymasters in the Third Reich, two rivals who were shrouded in mystery and sworn to secrecy. With thousands of agents at their command, they were entrusted with Germany's most sensitive intelligence operations in World War II. In the end, one man would kill for Hitler, the other would betray him.

Wed 22nd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the small village of Caerwent in Wales, one of the country's best preserved Roman sites. The archaeologists excavate a prime location that has previously been untouched, revealing a whole host of finds including a maze of walls and a villa.

Wed 22nd February

Pompeii: Cellar of Skeletons

Fifty-four strange, twisted skeletons - how did they die, but more importantly, how did they live? The biggest ever forensic investigation into skeletal remains in Pompeii is now underway - and the secrets of the rich and poor are revealed, from their sex lives, to their diet, to their extraordinary racial origins and the priceless treasures they were found with. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is examined as never before, including the massive earthquake which preceded it. After such a huge natural disaster, why did the people in the cellar ignore the warning signs and choose to stay in Pompeii? And in the face of impending disaster - with the ensuing looting and panic - how did they survive for so long? Presenter Don Wildman takes us on a forensic investigation that will change the way we see Pompeii forever.

Wed 22nd February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Wed 22nd February

Life In The War

In 1944, a week after the Allies' Normandy landings, Britain's period of relative calm is disrupted as Hitler strikes back with a terrifying new weapon - the V1 flying bomb.

Wed 22nd February

Lest We Forget

This programme explores West Indian ex-servicemen and women who served in the British forces in both world wars. The personalities include a soldier who fought for the English regiment in WWII, a pilot who joined the ATS, plus other individuals who were in the ground crew in the RAF. The film traces the story of these individuals from those early war years through to Enoch Powell's era in 1968 when he requested these servicemen return to their home country.

Wed 22nd February

Roman Britain from the Air

Christine Bleakley and Dr Michael Scott take to the skies to see what life was like for Romans and Britons 2000 years ago. London was created by the Romans and that can be seen more clearly from the air than on the ground, giving this film a very unique take on British history. In a novel journey across the UK, from London to Wales and then heading up north to the spectacular Hadrian's Wall, some of the secrets of everyday life in Roman Britain are uncovered; they came across 1800 year old hand cream, find a massive chunk of Roman Britain in an underground car park and visit a Roman toilet on the very edge of the Roman Empire.

Wed 22nd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the small village of Caerwent in Wales, one of the country's best preserved Roman sites. The archaeologists excavate a prime location that has previously been untouched, revealing a whole host of finds including a maze of walls and a villa.

Wed 22nd February

Meet the Romans

Forsaking Emperors and battles but embracing the latest archaeological evidence, she reveals what went on behind closed doors and in the public baths. 2000 years ago, Rome was 'the' city, with heaving population of over one million. The average citizen's diaries and letters no longer exist - but their epitaphs and funerary monuments do - and they reveal the extraordinary biographies of the wives and children, the butchers and barman, the slaves and shopkeepers of this truly amazing city.

Wed 22nd February

Pompeii: Cellar of Skeletons

Fifty-four strange, twisted skeletons - how did they die, but more importantly, how did they live? The biggest ever forensic investigation into skeletal remains in Pompeii is now underway - and the secrets of the rich and poor are revealed, from their sex lives, to their diet, to their extraordinary racial origins and the priceless treasures they were found with. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is examined as never before, including the massive earthquake which preceded it. After such a huge natural disaster, why did the people in the cellar ignore the warning signs and choose to stay in Pompeii? And in the face of impending disaster - with the ensuing looting and panic - how did they survive for so long? Presenter Don Wildman takes us on a forensic investigation that will change the way we see Pompeii forever.

Wed 22nd February

Noon

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Wed 22nd February

The Mystery of the Body in the Bog

In 2011 peat cutters working in Cashel Bog in Ireland accidentally unearthed a spectacularly well-preserved mummified corpse an Iron Age bog body with face, skin, hair and internal organs apparently intact. Bog bodies are one of Europe's strangest ancient phenomenon; almost all show signs of shockingly violent death: nipples cut, abdomens sliced open, skulls broken, throats sliced and stabs to the heart. Ned Kelly is one of the world's leading authorities on bog bodies and believes he can identify one of them as an Iron Age King of Ireland something no one has ever thought possible. Could Kelly have resolved one of the great mysteries of European culture? Is there enough evidence to suggest that the bog bodies of Britain, Holland, Germany and the Netherlands were also sacrificed Kings? This exciting programme sets off to visit Europe's bog bodies to re-examine them with this explosive new theory in mind, discovering that the culture of the bog bodies was, although violent, complex, sophisticated and strange.

Wed 22nd February

Tales of the Gun

For over 400 years, if a man could afford a gun, he chose a shotgun. First used for sport by British aristocrats, its other incarnations include hunter, protector and warrior.

Wed 22nd February

Dogfights

A generational leap in technology and strategy is put to the ultimate test over enemy airspace in Iraq. The air combat of the future begins with America's first large scale air offensive since the Vietnam War. On the first night of the war an Iraqi Mirage F1 attacks an unarmed EF-111. Watch as F-15C pilots take on a pair of Iraqi MiG-25 interceptors. Finally Captain Cesar Rodriguez takes on MiGs, in a classic Beyond Visual Range engagement that illustrates the awe-striking power of modern weapons technology.

Wed 22nd February

Rome: The World's First Superpower

Discover how an extraordinary people rose from humble beginnings to create the greatest empire mankind has ever seen.

Wed 22nd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the Yorkshire Dales for an archaeological first as they investigate a settlement built by railway navvies, arguably the toughest and most lawless breed of the Victorian era. The team uncover the houses and workshops of the Risehill camp, built during the construction of the Settle to Carlisle railway, and discover the story of a resilient community who survived the harsh environment and poor working conditions to produce a monument that is still in use today.

Wed 22nd February

Evening

Australia: The Story of Us

The island continent is about to launch itself on the world stage as never before. Elaine Moir's courage saves hundreds of Vietnamese babies. Australia's bionic ear gives hope to millions. Ben Lexcen's genius is essential to the defeat of a superpower and the winning of the America's Cup. Paul Hogan takes a quintessentially Australian story and enthrals the world. And for a minute unlike any before in its history, Australians stand as one to barrack for Cathy Freeman. We consider how far we have come - and how much further there is to go.

Wed 22nd February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Wed 22nd February

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centres, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers - a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Wed 22nd February

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Wed 22nd February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Wed 22nd February

East to West

The Renaissance - the moment that marks the beginning of the modern world and the first steps on the road of rational scientific progress which would take us to the industrial revolution, modern medicine, air travel and the internet. But it was not just a European event. It began in Baghdad in the 8th Century AD. In this film we will reveal how a golden age of invention and scholarship thrived in the Islamic World at a time when Europe lingered in a dark age; how Muslim scholars brought together for the first time the ideas of the Greeks and Romans with Persian and Indian mathematics and astronomy and developed it into the beginnings of modern Science. We will reveal the first contacts by which European scholars discovered this treasury of knowledge and how it was developed by generations of Arab-admirers (including Galileo and Copernicus) into modern science. This episode focuses on the House of Wisdom in Baghdad, the great university mosques of Cairo and uncovers ancient documents translated in Baghdad by Islamic scholars, now in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. For the first time, the story of the birth and flourishing of civilisation in the Near and Middle East and it's huge influence on the West. Much of what happened in the West was only on the margins of the real engine room of artistic, religious and social evolution. For crucial phases in world history the key place was the Middle East - an extraordinary region that for millennia has been a political, economic and cultural centre of the world and a bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa and Europe. For the foundation of science, justice, monotheism, commerce, civil rights and artistic expression - look Eastward. This is a complex truth; it encompasses vast Empires, reveals amassed libraries of manuscripts, assesses the Conquests period, the Ottomans and the Renaissance, travels the Silk Route, and covers three continents.

Thu 23rd February

Morning

Tales of the Gun

For over 400 years, if a man could afford a gun, he chose a shotgun. First used for sport by British aristocrats, its other incarnations include hunter, protector and warrior.

Thu 23rd February

Dogfights

A generational leap in technology and strategy is put to the ultimate test over enemy airspace in Iraq. The air combat of the future begins with America's first large scale air offensive since the Vietnam War. On the first night of the war an Iraqi Mirage F1 attacks an unarmed EF-111. Watch as F-15C pilots take on a pair of Iraqi MiG-25 interceptors. Finally Captain Cesar Rodriguez takes on MiGs, in a classic Beyond Visual Range engagement that illustrates the awe-striking power of modern weapons technology.

Thu 23rd February

Secrets of War

In World War II, one of Germany's best-kept secrets was the code machine Enigma. But this covert weapon would also become one of the greatest tools the Allies used against the Third Reich. British codebreakers were behind the greatest campaign of deception in military history, changing the outcome of World War II.

Thu 23rd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the Yorkshire Dales for an archaeological first as they investigate a settlement built by railway navvies, arguably the toughest and most lawless breed of the Victorian era. The team uncover the houses and workshops of the Risehill camp, built during the construction of the Settle to Carlisle railway, and discover the story of a resilient community who survived the harsh environment and poor working conditions to produce a monument that is still in use today.

Thu 23rd February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Thu 23rd February

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centres, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers - a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Thu 23rd February

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Thu 23rd February

The Mystery of the Body in the Bog

In 2011 peat cutters working in Cashel Bog in Ireland accidentally unearthed a spectacularly well-preserved mummified corpse an Iron Age bog body with face, skin, hair and internal organs apparently intact. Bog bodies are one of Europe's strangest ancient phenomenon; almost all show signs of shockingly violent death: nipples cut, abdomens sliced open, skulls broken, throats sliced and stabs to the heart. Ned Kelly is one of the world's leading authorities on bog bodies and believes he can identify one of them as an Iron Age King of Ireland something no one has ever thought possible. Could Kelly have resolved one of the great mysteries of European culture? Is there enough evidence to suggest that the bog bodies of Britain, Holland, Germany and the Netherlands were also sacrificed Kings? This exciting programme sets off to visit Europe's bog bodies to re-examine them with this explosive new theory in mind, discovering that the culture of the bog bodies was, although violent, complex, sophisticated and strange.

Thu 23rd February

East to West

The Renaissance - the moment that marks the beginning of the modern world and the first steps on the road of rational scientific progress which would take us to the industrial revolution, modern medicine, air travel and the internet. But it was not just a European event. It began in Baghdad in the 8th Century AD. In this film we will reveal how a golden age of invention and scholarship thrived in the Islamic World at a time when Europe lingered in a dark age; how Muslim scholars brought together for the first time the ideas of the Greeks and Romans with Persian and Indian mathematics and astronomy and developed it into the beginnings of modern Science. We will reveal the first contacts by which European scholars discovered this treasury of knowledge and how it was developed by generations of Arab-admirers (including Galileo and Copernicus) into modern science. This episode focuses on the House of Wisdom in Baghdad, the great university mosques of Cairo and uncovers ancient documents translated in Baghdad by Islamic scholars, now in the Bodleian Library, Oxford. For the first time, the story of the birth and flourishing of civilisation in the Near and Middle East and it's huge influence on the West. Much of what happened in the West was only on the margins of the real engine room of artistic, religious and social evolution. For crucial phases in world history the key place was the Middle East - an extraordinary region that for millennia has been a political, economic and cultural centre of the world and a bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa and Europe. For the foundation of science, justice, monotheism, commerce, civil rights and artistic expression - look Eastward. This is a complex truth; it encompasses vast Empires, reveals amassed libraries of manuscripts, assesses the Conquests period, the Ottomans and the Renaissance, travels the Silk Route, and covers three continents.

Thu 23rd February

Rome: The World's First Superpower

Discover how an extraordinary people rose from humble beginnings to create the greatest empire mankind has ever seen.

Thu 23rd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team head to the Yorkshire Dales for an archaeological first as they investigate a settlement built by railway navvies, arguably the toughest and most lawless breed of the Victorian era. The team uncover the houses and workshops of the Risehill camp, built during the construction of the Settle to Carlisle railway, and discover the story of a resilient community who survived the harsh environment and poor working conditions to produce a monument that is still in use today.

Thu 23rd February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Thu 23rd February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Thu 23rd February

Noon

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centres, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers - a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Thu 23rd February

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Thu 23rd February

Tales of the Gun

What are the stories behind the history, technology and design of firearms?

Thu 23rd February

Dogfights

In the face of the wholesale destruction of their homeland, young Germans were motivated to destroy American bombers by any means necessary.

Thu 23rd February

Caligula with Mary Beard

Two thousand years ago one of history's most notorious individuals was born. Historian Mary Beard embarks on an investigative journey to explore the life and times of Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus - better known to us as Caligula. Known as Rome's most capricious tyrant, he was said to have made his horse a consul, proclaimed himself a living God, and indulged in scandalous orgies and that's before building vast bridges across land and sea, prostituting senators' wives and killing half the Roman elite on a whim. All that in just four short years in power, before a violent and speedy assassination at just 29 years ol Mary explores the 'real' Caligula in an array of unexpected places. From Germania to Capri, from Rome to Lake Nemi, she exposes and analyses historical accounts and assembles tantalising fragments of evidence. Mary reveals an astonishing story of murder, intrigue and dynastic family power. Above all, she'll explain why Caligula has ended up with such a reputation; and, in the process, reveal a more intriguing portrait of not just the monster, but the man.

Thu 23rd February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team have a prized opportunity to dig in the grounds of Salisbury Cathedral and in three days reveal the long-lost bell tower, plus evidence of those who built the church. The discovery of bones in an area that once housed the cathedral's most powerful bishop pushes the team's investigative powers to the limit, with further finds resulting in the team having to rewrite the building's history at the conclusion of their dig.

Thu 23rd February

Evening

Rome Unwrapped

This is the story of the power that made Rome great. The most disciplined and deadly force in the ancient world: the legion army. Though history remembers the names of emperors and generals it's these ordinary men who carved and kept an empire. They trained, they fought, they marched thousands of miles on roads that they themselves had built. Using the ancient records and scientific research and extraordinary archaeological finds we trace their journey as invaders, killers, peacekeepers, colonists from the furthest frontiers back to the city for which they killed and died. These are the men of the Roman military machine.

Thu 23rd February

History's Greatest Hoaxes

An inadvertent hoax perhaps? Or a very clever ploy that made an unknown 23-year-old New York City radio producer famous overnight? Either way, Orson Welles' infamous broadcast adaptation of the HG Wells story on Halloween 1938 sent America into a tailspin as millions became convinced that Earth really was being invaded by aliens from Mars. It is one of the most extraordinary tales in broadcasting history and we'll show how and why in this episode.

Thu 23rd February

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Inexplicable disappearances and stories of mysterious DNA experiments may be explained by ancient Karuk Indian legend of powerful and sometimes evil spirits above tree line above at the summit of California's Mount Shasta National Park.

Thu 23rd February

Unsealed: Conspiracy Files

New developments in science and research have invented equipment that may have much more sinister capabilities than we are being led to believe. Are governments around the world using weather control to incite the next world war and possibly destroy the planet?

Thu 23rd February

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Could the strange shapes of the universe solve the mysteries that have haunted mankind since ancient times? Is the eye of God peering at us from the heavens? What is the strange hexagon at the pole of Saturn, or the face on the Moon? Each shape tells its own story of an object's origin, and how physical forces shaped the Universe, and each is a chapter in the greater saga of existence.

Thu 23rd February

Unsealed: Alien Files

It's the stuff of nightmares. Emergency lines are flooded with calls as UFOs appear in the sky faster than authorities can track them. Mounting evidence has revealed that UFO waves are able to penetrate the world's most closely guarded airspace at will. From the dawn of the Atomic Age to fantastic voyages through invisible dimensions, join us as the shocking secrets of UFO waves are unsealed. It's the stuff of nightmares. Emergency lines are flooded with calls as UFOs appear in the sky faster than authorities can track them. Mounting evidence has revealed that UFO waves are able to penetrate the world's most closely guarded airspace at will. From the dawn of the Atomic Age to fantastic voyages through invisible dimensions, join us as the shocking secrets of UFO waves are unsealed.

Thu 23rd February

The Conspiracy Show

Is this famous piece of linen the actual burial cloth of Jesus Christ or a clever medieval hoax? Richard speaks with top Shroud investigators, who provide the latest scientific evidence they claim proves the cloth is not only authentic, but contains evidence of an actual resurrection event.

Thu 23rd February

The Universe

It bursts from the sun with the power of 10,000 nuclear weapons, and when it hits our planet, it could create the largest disaster in recorded history. A magnetic storm from the sun could wipe out electrical power, television, radio, military communication and nearly every piece of electronics in the northern hemisphere. It's a solar Katrina, a planet-wide hurricane of magnetic forces that scramble all 21st-century technology, possibly for good. What causes this magnetic superstorm? Why is magnetism so powerful and yet so poorly understood? And is there anything we can do to prevent the magnetic storm?

Fri 24th February

Morning

Tales of the Gun

What are the stories behind the history, technology and design of firearms?

Fri 24th February

Dogfights

In the face of the wholesale destruction of their homeland, young Germans were motivated to destroy American bombers by any means necessary.

Fri 24th February

Secrets of War

They were unlikely heroes who fought behind enemy lines in every theatre of World War II. Female spies unearthed secrets, supported the resistance and destroyed the morale of the enemy. From women OSS agents dropped behind enemy lines to female radio operators inside the Third Reich, women played a decisive intelligence-gathering role in the war.

Fri 24th February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team have a prized opportunity to dig in the grounds of Salisbury Cathedral and in three days reveal the long-lost bell tower, plus evidence of those who built the church. The discovery of bones in an area that once housed the cathedral's most powerful bishop pushes the team's investigative powers to the limit, with further finds resulting in the team having to rewrite the building's history at the conclusion of their dig.

Fri 24th February

History's Greatest Hoaxes

An inadvertent hoax perhaps? Or a very clever ploy that made an unknown 23-year-old New York City radio producer famous overnight? Either way, Orson Welles' infamous broadcast adaptation of the HG Wells story on Halloween 1938 sent America into a tailspin as millions became convinced that Earth really was being invaded by aliens from Mars. It is one of the most extraordinary tales in broadcasting history and we'll show how and why in this episode.

Fri 24th February

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Inexplicable disappearances and stories of mysterious DNA experiments may be explained by ancient Karuk Indian legend of powerful and sometimes evil spirits above tree line above at the summit of California's Mount Shasta National Park.

Fri 24th February

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Could the strange shapes of the universe solve the mysteries that have haunted mankind since ancient times? Is the eye of God peering at us from the heavens? What is the strange hexagon at the pole of Saturn, or the face on the Moon? Each shape tells its own story of an object's origin, and how physical forces shaped the Universe, and each is a chapter in the greater saga of existence.

Fri 24th February

Unsealed: Alien Files

It's the stuff of nightmares. Emergency lines are flooded with calls as UFOs appear in the sky faster than authorities can track them. Mounting evidence has revealed that UFO waves are able to penetrate the world's most closely guarded airspace at will. From the dawn of the Atomic Age to fantastic voyages through invisible dimensions, join us as the shocking secrets of UFO waves are unsealed. It's the stuff of nightmares. Emergency lines are flooded with calls as UFOs appear in the sky faster than authorities can track them. Mounting evidence has revealed that UFO waves are able to penetrate the world's most closely guarded airspace at will. From the dawn of the Atomic Age to fantastic voyages through invisible dimensions, join us as the shocking secrets of UFO waves are unsealed.

Fri 24th February

The Conspiracy Show

Is this famous piece of linen the actual burial cloth of Jesus Christ or a clever medieval hoax? Richard speaks with top Shroud investigators, who provide the latest scientific evidence they claim proves the cloth is not only authentic, but contains evidence of an actual resurrection event.

Fri 24th February

The Universe

It bursts from the sun with the power of 10,000 nuclear weapons, and when it hits our planet, it could create the largest disaster in recorded history. A magnetic storm from the sun could wipe out electrical power, television, radio, military communication and nearly every piece of electronics in the northern hemisphere. It's a solar Katrina, a planet-wide hurricane of magnetic forces that scramble all 21st-century technology, possibly for good. What causes this magnetic superstorm? Why is magnetism so powerful and yet so poorly understood? And is there anything we can do to prevent the magnetic storm?

Fri 24th February

Caligula with Mary Beard

Two thousand years ago one of history's most notorious individuals was born. Historian Mary Beard embarks on an investigative journey to explore the life and times of Gaius Julius Caesar Augustus Germanicus - better known to us as Caligula. Known as Rome's most capricious tyrant, he was said to have made his horse a consul, proclaimed himself a living God, and indulged in scandalous orgies and that's before building vast bridges across land and sea, prostituting senators' wives and killing half the Roman elite on a whim. All that in just four short years in power, before a violent and speedy assassination at just 29 years ol Mary explores the 'real' Caligula in an array of unexpected places. From Germania to Capri, from Rome to Lake Nemi, she exposes and analyses historical accounts and assembles tantalising fragments of evidence. Mary reveals an astonishing story of murder, intrigue and dynastic family power. Above all, she'll explain why Caligula has ended up with such a reputation; and, in the process, reveal a more intriguing portrait of not just the monster, but the man.

Fri 24th February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team have a prized opportunity to dig in the grounds of Salisbury Cathedral and in three days reveal the long-lost bell tower, plus evidence of those who built the church. The discovery of bones in an area that once housed the cathedral's most powerful bishop pushes the team's investigative powers to the limit, with further finds resulting in the team having to rewrite the building's history at the conclusion of their dig.

Fri 24th February

Rome Unwrapped

This is the story of the power that made Rome great. The most disciplined and deadly force in the ancient world: the legion army. Though history remembers the names of emperors and generals it's these ordinary men who carved and kept an empire. They trained, they fought, they marched thousands of miles on roads that they themselves had built. Using the ancient records and scientific research and extraordinary archaeological finds we trace their journey as invaders, killers, peacekeepers, colonists from the furthest frontiers back to the city for which they killed and died. These are the men of the Roman military machine.

Fri 24th February

History's Greatest Hoaxes

An inadvertent hoax perhaps? Or a very clever ploy that made an unknown 23-year-old New York City radio producer famous overnight? Either way, Orson Welles' infamous broadcast adaptation of the HG Wells story on Halloween 1938 sent America into a tailspin as millions became convinced that Earth really was being invaded by aliens from Mars. It is one of the most extraordinary tales in broadcasting history and we'll show how and why in this episode.

Fri 24th February

Noon

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Inexplicable disappearances and stories of mysterious DNA experiments may be explained by ancient Karuk Indian legend of powerful and sometimes evil spirits above tree line above at the summit of California's Mount Shasta National Park.

Fri 24th February

Unsealed: Conspiracy Files

New developments in science and research have invented equipment that may have much more sinister capabilities than we are being led to believe. Are governments around the world using weather control to incite the next world war and possibly destroy the planet?

Fri 24th February

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Could the strange shapes of the universe solve the mysteries that have haunted mankind since ancient times? Is the eye of God peering at us from the heavens? What is the strange hexagon at the pole of Saturn, or the face on the Moon? Each shape tells its own story of an object's origin, and how physical forces shaped the Universe, and each is a chapter in the greater saga of existence.

Fri 24th February

Tales of the Gun

What are the stories behind the history, technology and design of firearms?

Fri 24th February

Dogfights

On November 20, 1944, in the early morning hours off the coast of the island of Ulithi the USS Mississinewa sits at anchor. The massive tanker is filled with oil: a vital supply ship for the American fleet as it continues its attacks on the Japanese empire. At 5:45am, a massive explosion rips apart the Mississinewa. But this is no accident. This is the work of the Kaiten: a terrifying new Kamikaze weapon.

Fri 24th February

The Last Days Of

Hero or Tyrant? How did Julius Caesar, Rome's greatest general, end up murdered by his friends and allies? Two thousand years after the event, the assassination of Julius Caesar still fascinates like no other act of political violence. It was an intensely brutal act - an unarmed man felled by the blades his friends and associates. Was it the necessary execution of a tyrant who would stop at nothing in his pursuit of power, or a cowardly murder by a fading elite? Robert Harris, Neil Faulkner, and classicist Maria Wyke, among others, unveil the real world of Roman politics, and reveal a classical Rome that has more in common with the Godfather, than good government.

Fri 24th February

Time Team

Tony and the team attempt to uncover the remains of a large medieval castle buried under a waterside field in Oxfordshire. It soon becomes apparent the site is more complex than first thought, with artefacts from the 12th and 17th centuries being unearthed.

Fri 24th February

Evening

Rome Unwrapped

This is the story of how Rome fell to the Christians. A superpower the mightiest in the ancient world, against a secretive pacifist cult born a thousand miles away. Christianity should never have survived but this is one of history's strangest victories. Using ancient sources, and travelling deep into the city's ancient past we unravel how the Christians infiltrated, endured, and over-ran Rome. We see how, from the earliest martyrs, to the first Christian empire, they used the very power of Rome to spread their message. The Roman Empire fell long ago. But Churches rose from its ruins.

Fri 24th February

Ivan the Terrible

For centuries, Ivan IV of Russia has been known as sadistic ruler 'Ivan the Terrible'. Is is really true?

Fri 24th February

Rome: What Lies Beneath

The Romans were one of the most intriguing and powerful civilisations to have ever lived. Now, building on the extraordinary techniques used in Egypt: What Lies Beneath, Dr Sarah Parcak and her team re-harness space-archaeology to discover what the glory of the Roman Empire was really like. With satellite archaeology and high-tech remote-sensing tools at its heart, this epic film peels back the layers of history to literally see Rome in all its magnificence. Culminating in a visually mind-blowing series of CGI revelations, viewers will be able to walk the streets of legend and discover the history of Rome as never before.

Fri 24th February

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Sat 25th February

Morning

America Unearthed

Deep beneath the Denver Airport, conspiracy theorists say a revolutionary group that calls itself the New World Order is operating a secret base from which they'll eventually obliterate our central government. Scott Wolter is determined to get to the truth about this wild allegation. Along the way, he uncovers secrets about the New World Order that suggest the group is connected not just to one, but two mysterious sites in America where coded messages portending the end of the world continue to mystify and even terrify the general public. What's the truth behind the New World Order - and will a tour of underground tunnels beneath the Denver Airport and the words of the only man who knows the truth, offer new clues to suggest whether the NWO claims have merit or is just part of a modern day myth?

Sat 25th February

Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura

Big Brother is watching, and it's not who you think. Jesse Ventura's investigation of government surveillance on its citizens tears the lid off a nationwide program that is thought to turn local businessmen and office workers into spies, snooping on their neighbours and ratting on their friends in exchange for information and special privileges from the FBI - including, some charge, a 'licence to kill'.

Sat 25th February

Monsters & Mysteries

An entire family takes up arms in a rooftop showdown with the Spottsville Monster, a vicious beast with a taste for flesh. Eerie phantoms protect survivors of one of America's most deadly tornadoes and New Jersey fishermen face off with a gigantic bug.

Sat 25th February

UFO Hunters

It has long been suspected that Nazi leaders had more than a passing interesting in the occult and UFOs. UFO investigators now believe there was a connection between the UFO phenomenon and the Third Reich. Could the technology that grew into our modern-day space program have been passed to the Germans by aliens, as some believe, and then confiscated by the US government after the end of World War II? Now, the team will travel to Germany and Poland to investigate bizarre alien links that go back hundreds of years.

Sat 25th February

Ivan the Terrible

For centuries, Ivan IV of Russia has been known as sadistic ruler 'Ivan the Terrible'. Is is really true?

Sat 25th February

Rome: What Lies Beneath

The Romans were one of the most intriguing and powerful civilisations to have ever lived. Now, building on the extraordinary techniques used in Egypt: What Lies Beneath, Dr Sarah Parcak and her team re-harness space-archaeology to discover what the glory of the Roman Empire was really like. With satellite archaeology and high-tech remote-sensing tools at its heart, this epic film peels back the layers of history to literally see Rome in all its magnificence. Culminating in a visually mind-blowing series of CGI revelations, viewers will be able to walk the streets of legend and discover the history of Rome as never before.

Sat 25th February

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Sat 25th February

The Last Days Of

Hero or Tyrant? How did Julius Caesar, Rome's greatest general, end up murdered by his friends and allies? Two thousand years after the event, the assassination of Julius Caesar still fascinates like no other act of political violence. It was an intensely brutal act - an unarmed man felled by the blades his friends and associates. Was it the necessary execution of a tyrant who would stop at nothing in his pursuit of power, or a cowardly murder by a fading elite? Robert Harris, Neil Faulkner, and classicist Maria Wyke, among others, unveil the real world of Roman politics, and reveal a classical Rome that has more in common with the Godfather, than good government.

Sat 25th February

Time Team

Tony and the team attempt to uncover the remains of a large medieval castle buried under a waterside field in Oxfordshire. It soon becomes apparent the site is more complex than first thought, with artefacts from the 12th and 17th centuries being unearthed.

Sat 25th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Sat 25th February

Ivan the Terrible

For centuries, Ivan IV of Russia has been known as sadistic ruler 'Ivan the Terrible'. Is is really true?

Sat 25th February

Noon

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Sat 25th February

Rome: What Lies Beneath

The Romans were one of the most intriguing and powerful civilisations to have ever lived. Now, building on the extraordinary techniques used in Egypt: What Lies Beneath, Dr Sarah Parcak and her team re-harness space-archaeology to discover what the glory of the Roman Empire was really like. With satellite archaeology and high-tech remote-sensing tools at its heart, this epic film peels back the layers of history to literally see Rome in all its magnificence. Culminating in a visually mind-blowing series of CGI revelations, viewers will be able to walk the streets of legend and discover the history of Rome as never before.

Sat 25th February

Pompeii: Cellar of Skeletons

Fifty-four strange, twisted skeletons - how did they die, but more importantly, how did they live? The biggest ever forensic investigation into skeletal remains in Pompeii is now underway - and the secrets of the rich and poor are revealed, from their sex lives, to their diet, to their extraordinary racial origins and the priceless treasures they were found with. The eruption of Mount Vesuvius is examined as never before, including the massive earthquake which preceded it. After such a huge natural disaster, why did the people in the cellar ignore the warning signs and choose to stay in Pompeii? And in the face of impending disaster - with the ensuing looting and panic - how did they survive for so long? Presenter Don Wildman takes us on a forensic investigation that will change the way we see Pompeii forever.

Sat 25th February

Treasures of Ancient Rome

Alastair Sooke charts the decline and fall of the Roman Empire through some of its hidden and most magical artistic treasures.

Sat 25th February

Evening

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Sat 25th February

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centres, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers - a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Sat 25th February

Barbarians Rising

The Republic becomes an Empire and continues a policy of Romanisation aimed at civilising the barbarians, but even the first emperor, Augustus Caesar, is blind to the enemies rising within Rome's own ranks. Arminius, the son of a Germanic barbarian chief is surrendered to Rome as a boy and becomes one of the highest ranked barbarian officers in the Imperial army, but when he's sent to his homeland to crush the rebellion underway among his own people, he must decide where his loyalties lie. The Battle of Teutoburg Forest pushes the Empire to the brink.

Sat 25th February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sat 25th February

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Sat 25th February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 26th February

Morning

History's Greatest Hoaxes

An inadvertent hoax perhaps? Or a very clever ploy that made an unknown 23-year-old New York City radio producer famous overnight?Either way, Orson Welles' infamous broadcast adaptation of the HG Wells story on Halloween 1938 sent America into a tailspin as millions became convinced that Earth really was being invaded by aliens from Mars. It is one of the most extraordinary tales in broadcasting history and we'll show how and why in this episode.

Sun 26th February

National Park: Secrets & Legends

In 2004, a Park Ranger camps out in a remote part of the Grand Canyon. She is near an area called the Confluence, where the Colorado and Little Colorado Rivers meet. She awakens to hear voices, and sees people dressed in 1950s clothing being led by Native spirits toward the Confluence. Some believe these figures are from the first major plane crash in US history, in 1956, when two commercial airliners collided over the canyon with 128 dead and no survivors. This mysterious sighting is the main force of the program's plot. The next mystery in the same area in 1909, when a lone explorer GE Kinkaid discovers a cave 1500 feet above the canyon walls. The cave appears alien, and Kinkaid says it spirals deep into the cliff, with room for up to 50,000 people. He says it contains artifacts from ancient Asia and Egypt, but that the Smithsonian took these items and they disappeared. Then, from 1961, the next clue is established. A university student named Hank Krastman is led blindfolded by a mysterious Hopi Indian into the Grand Canyon. He is led to a rock wall which he discovers is a hologram gateway to a secret city with advanced technology. After hours in this magical city, Hank goes back to find it but cannot. The link is clearly made to the previous stories, hinting there may be a hidden presence in Grand Canyon National Park. The final piece comes from the Canyon's indigenous peoples, who claim the Confluence is near their most sacred site: the Sipapu. They claim the Sipapu is home of a non-human species called the Ant People, who have protected them from natural catastrophe for 3000 years. The program concludes with the question whether the Sipapu is the center of power in the Grand Canyon, and the reason for a long series of mysterious incidents and encounters.

Sun 26th February

Great Mysteries and Myths

A documentary series for those who believe there can be nothing in the world more fascinating than the search for truth behind the most extraordinary mysteries and myths of the 20th century. A truly unique collection of stories shrouded in superstition and tragedy, this series brings to light a new perspective on these compelling and dark secrets.

Sun 26th February

Monsters & Mysteries

Across Southern Illinois, townsfolk arm themselves against a demonic feline predator. A teenage girl tangles with a terrifying doppelganger that attempts to take her place. Two police chopper pilots in air combat with a UFO trying to shoot them down.

Sun 26th February

Ancient Aliens

We uncover 75 million years of the most credible alien evidence on Earth, from the age of the dinosaurs, to ancient Egypt.

Sun 26th February

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centers, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers-a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Sun 26th February

Barbarians Rising

The Republic becomes an Empire and continues a policy of Romanisation aimed at civilising the barbarians, but even the first emperor, Augustus Caesar, is blind to the enemies rising within Rome's own ranks. Arminius, the son of a Germanic barbarian chief is surrendered to Rome as a boy and becomes one of the highest ranked barbarian officers in the Imperial army, but when he's sent to his homeland to crush the rebellion underway among his own people, he must decide where his loyalties lie. The Battle of Teutoburg Forest pushes the Empire to the brink.

Sun 26th February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

The series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, Blood and Fury: America's Civil War features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sun 26th February

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Sun 26th February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 26th February

The Story Of British Pathe

In the age before mass tourism made international travel affordable and accessible to most of us, their sumptuous travelogues and anthropological documentaries offered British cinema-goers a rare opportunity to glimpse faraway worlds. For decades, Pathe dutifully covered royal tours to every corner of the British Empire, but by the 1950s, when the first package holidays were sold, the company also recorded the experiences of the first generations of Britons who were able to indulge in leisure travel around the globe.

Sun 26th February

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centers, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers-a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Sun 26th February

Barbarians Rising

The Republic becomes an Empire and continues a policy of Romanisation aimed at civilising the barbarians, but even the first emperor, Augustus Caesar, is blind to the enemies rising within Rome's own ranks. Arminius, the son of a Germanic barbarian chief is surrendered to Rome as a boy and becomes one of the highest ranked barbarian officers in the Imperial army, but when he's sent to his homeland to crush the rebellion underway among his own people, he must decide where his loyalties lie. The Battle of Teutoburg Forest pushes the Empire to the brink.

Sun 26th February

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

The series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, Blood and Fury: America's Civil War features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sun 26th February

Noon

Hunting Hitler

A group of specialists work together to try and find the truth of Hitler's supposed death. Did he really die in the bunker?

Sun 26th February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 26th February

The Story Of British Pathe

In the age before mass tourism made international travel affordable and accessible to most of us, their sumptuous travelogues and anthropological documentaries offered British cinema-goers a rare opportunity to glimpse faraway worlds. For decades, Pathe dutifully covered royal tours to every corner of the British Empire, but by the 1950s, when the first package holidays were sold, the company also recorded the experiences of the first generations of Britons who were able to indulge in leisure travel around the globe.

Sun 26th February

The Civil War by Ken Burns

The year of 1862 saw the birth of modern warfare and the transformation of Lincoln's war to preserve the union into a struggle to emancipate the slaves.

Sun 26th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Sun 26th February

Grand Tours of the Scottish Islands

In this series, historian Paul Murton sets out to experience life on Scotland's magnificent islands. He uncovers the past and reveals its connections with the present, pointing to all that makes these islands quirky, surprising and beautiful.

Sun 26th February

Evening

Tony Robinson's Time Travels

History is full of rule breakers and rabble-rousers who stand up against injustice. In this episode Tony embarks upon a journey to find out just what it takes to make a difference. Time travelling to the first century AD in Britain, Tony tells how a Celtic Queen fought back Roman invaders. He visits 19th century New Zealand, to understand the women who struggled and won the right to be heard. Tony lands in the Victorian Goldfields to witness a pivotal moment in Australian history where democracy was born. He also meets a bunch of Melbournians who took to the streets in 1969, shouting expletives to protest against restrictive censorship laws. In the 1790s, Tony tracks down the indigenous warrior and his band of resistance fighters, who waged a guerrilla war in the early days of colonial Australia. Whether they fought for a country, a people, or an idea, these remarkable men and women changed history by challenging authority and fighting oppression.

Sun 26th February

Empire of the Seas

Historian Dan Snow charts the defining role the Royal Navy played in Britain's struggle for modernity, a grand tale of the twists and turns which thrust the people of the British Isles into an indelible relationship with the sea and ships. Heart of Oak opens with a dramatic retelling of 16th- and 17th-century history. Victory over the Armada proved a turning point in the nation's story as tiny, impoverished England was transformed into a seafaring nation, one whose future wealth and power lay on the oceans. The ruthless exploits of Elizabethan seafaring heroes like Francis Drake created a potent new sense of national identity that combined patriotism and Protestantism with private profiteering. At sea and on land, Snow shows how the Navy became an indispensable tool of state, weaving the stories of characters like Drake, God's Republican warrior at sea, Robert Blake, and Samuel Pepys, administrator par excellence, who laid the foundations for Britain's modern civil service. With access to the modern Navy and reconstructed ships of the time, Snow recounts the Navy's metamorphosis from a rabble of West Country freebooters to possibly the most complex industrial enterprise on earth.

Sun 26th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Sun 26th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team examine creativity and the art of reinvention along Tasmania's northern coast and offshore islands. Neil collects some of the cleanest air in the world in the name of science. On King Island, he examines the worst maritime disaster in the history of Australia before swinging back onto the mainland for a round of golf on a legendary links course. Emma Johnston joins a scientific team on Albatross Island to track the magnificent bird for which the island is named. Alice Garner examines the changing fortunes of industrial Burnie. And Tim Flannery follows in the footsteps of a legendary scientist at Fossil Bluff.

Sun 26th February

Secrets Of The Duomo

The secrets of the dome that rises over the town of Florence were buried centuries ago within the cathedral itself - along with the enigmatic genius who designed and built it: Filipo Brunelleschi. How was Brunelleschi able to build the world's largest brick and mortar dome, at a time when the technological know-how of the time should have made it impossible? One scholar has gone to the extreme lengths of constructing his own model of the dome to prove his theory. Just as he reaches the moment of truth, a huge discovery is made beneath the streets of Florence. For the first time in centuries, more evidence surfaces - an original brick model of the dome. The likely builder? Brunelleschi himself. This film tracks the storm still raging over one of the most magnificent and miraculous achievements of humankind.

Sun 26th February

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

What was the astronomical reality behind the star that, according to the Gospel of Matthew, guided the Magi to the young Jesus? This episode examines almost 20 centuries of theories, including meteors, novae, supernovae and comets, but is the truth to be found in a combination of astronomy and astrology? Recent theories suggest that the 'star' was the planet Jupiter in a series of conjunctions with other planets, stars and constellations, and that these conjunctions were interpreted by the Magi-astrologers and priests of the Zoroastrian religion as heralding the birth of the Jewish Messiah.

Sun 26th February

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

In this episode, Chris Tarrant discovers the 'Land of the Rising Sun' is the Land of the Train. Chris journeys a thousand miles across Japan to find out if Japanese railways really are the best in the world... and why they're so obsessed by them. Along the way he meets one of the great architects of the bullet trains, a celebrity Station Master cat, a singing conductress and atomic bomb survivors who kept wartime trams running.

Mon 27th February

Morning

Tales of the Gun

What are the stories behind the history, technology and design of firearms?

Mon 27th February

Dogfights

On November 20, 1944, in the early morning hours off the coast of the island of Ulithi the USS Mississinewa sits at anchor. The massive tanker is filled with oil: a vital supply ship for the American fleet as it continues its attacks on the Japanese empire. At 5:45am, a massive explosion rips apart the Mississinewa. But this is no accident. This is the work of the Kaiten: a terrifying new Kamikaze weapon.

Mon 27th February

Secrets of War

Born of great desperation and used under the cover of darkness, special tools of spies and espionage agents delivered war to the heart of the enemy on the invisible battleground.

Mon 27th February

Time Team

Tony and the team attempt to uncover the remains of a large medieval castle buried under a waterside field in Oxfordshire. It soon becomes apparent the site is more complex than first thought, with artefacts from the 12th and 17th centuries being unearthed.

Mon 27th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Mon 27th February

Empire of the Seas

Historian Dan Snow charts the defining role the Royal Navy played in Britain's struggle for modernity, a grand tale of the twists and turns which thrust the people of the British Isles into an indelible relationship with the sea and ships. Heart of Oak opens with a dramatic retelling of 16th- and 17th-century history. Victory over the Armada proved a turning point in the nation's story as tiny, impoverished England was transformed into a seafaring nation, one whose future wealth and power lay on the oceans. The ruthless exploits of Elizabethan seafaring heroes like Francis Drake created a potent new sense of national identity that combined patriotism and Protestantism with private profiteering. At sea and on land, Snow shows how the Navy became an indispensable tool of state, weaving the stories of characters like Drake, God's Republican warrior at sea, Robert Blake, and Samuel Pepys, administrator par excellence, who laid the foundations for Britain's modern civil service. With access to the modern Navy and reconstructed ships of the time, Snow recounts the Navy's metamorphosis from a rabble of West Country freebooters to possibly the most complex industrial enterprise on earth.

Mon 27th February

Secrets Of The Duomo

The secrets of the dome that rises over the town of Florence were buried centuries ago within the cathedral itself - along with the enigmatic genius who designed and built it: Filipo Brunelleschi. How was Brunelleschi able to build the world's largest brick and mortar dome, at a time when the technological know-how of the time should have made it impossible? One scholar has gone to the extreme lengths of constructing his own model of the dome to prove his theory. Just as he reaches the moment of truth, a huge discovery is made beneath the streets of Florence. For the first time in centuries, more evidence surfaces - an original brick model of the dome. The likely builder? Brunelleschi himself. This film tracks the storm still raging over one of the most magnificent and miraculous achievements of humankind.

Mon 27th February

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

What was the astronomical reality behind the star that, according to the Gospel of Matthew, guided the Magi to the young Jesus? This episode examines almost 20 centuries of theories, including meteors, novae, supernovae and comets, but is the truth to be found in a combination of astronomy and astrology? Recent theories suggest that the 'star' was the planet Jupiter in a series of conjunctions with other planets, stars and constellations, and that these conjunctions were interpreted by the Magi-astrologers and priests of the Zoroastrian religion as heralding the birth of the Jewish Messiah.

Mon 27th February

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

In this episode, Chris Tarrant discovers the 'Land of the Rising Sun' is the Land of the Train. Chris journeys a thousand miles across Japan to find out if Japanese railways really are the best in the world... and why they're so obsessed by them. Along the way he meets one of the great architects of the bullet trains, a celebrity Station Master cat, a singing conductress and atomic bomb survivors who kept wartime trams running.

Mon 27th February

The Civil War by Ken Burns

The year of 1862 saw the birth of modern warfare and the transformation of Lincoln's war to preserve the union into a struggle to emancipate the slaves.

Mon 27th February

Grand Tours of the Scottish Islands

In this series, historian Paul Murton sets out to experience life on Scotland's magnificent islands. He uncovers the past and reveals its connections with the present, pointing to all that makes these islands quirky, surprising and beautiful.

Mon 27th February

Tony Robinson's Time Travels

History is full of rule breakers and rabble-rousers who stand up against injustice. In this episode Tony embarks upon a journey to find out just what it takes to make a difference. Time travelling to the first century AD in Britain, Tony tells how a Celtic Queen fought back Roman invaders. He visits 19th century New Zealand, to understand the women who struggled and won the right to be heard. Tony lands in the Victorian Goldfields to witness a pivotal moment in Australian history where democracy was born. He also meets a bunch of Melbournians who took to the streets in 1969, shouting expletives to protest against restrictive censorship laws. In the 1790s, Tony tracks down the indigenous warrior and his band of resistance fighters, who waged a guerrilla war in the early days of colonial Australia. Whether they fought for a country, a people, or an idea, these remarkable men and women changed history by challenging authority and fighting oppression.

Mon 27th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Mon 27th February

Secrets Of The Duomo

The secrets of the dome that rises over the town of Florence were buried centuries ago within the cathedral itself - along with the enigmatic genius who designed and built it: Filipo Brunelleschi. How was Brunelleschi able to build the world's largest brick and mortar dome, at a time when the technological know-how of the time should have made it impossible? One scholar has gone to the extreme lengths of constructing his own model of the dome to prove his theory. Just as he reaches the moment of truth, a huge discovery is made beneath the streets of Florence. For the first time in centuries, more evidence surfaces - an original brick model of the dome. The likely builder? Brunelleschi himself. This film tracks the storm still raging over one of the most magnificent and miraculous achievements of humankind.

Mon 27th February

Noon

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

What was the astronomical reality behind the star that, according to the Gospel of Matthew, guided the Magi to the young Jesus? This episode examines almost 20 centuries of theories, including meteors, novae, supernovae and comets, but is the truth to be found in a combination of astronomy and astrology? Recent theories suggest that the 'star' was the planet Jupiter in a series of conjunctions with other planets, stars and constellations, and that these conjunctions were interpreted by the Magi-astrologers and priests of the Zoroastrian religion as heralding the birth of the Jewish Messiah.

Mon 27th February

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

In this episode, Chris Tarrant discovers the 'Land of the Rising Sun' is the Land of the Train. Chris journeys a thousand miles across Japan to find out if Japanese railways really are the best in the world... and why they're so obsessed by them. Along the way he meets one of the great architects of the bullet trains, a celebrity Station Master cat, a singing conductress and atomic bomb survivors who kept wartime trams running.

Mon 27th February

Tales of the Gun

Marvels of technology and spectacular in their sheer power, big guns have shaped the nature of warfare for centuries. Though of humble origins, the evolved into some of the biggest and most complicated machines of destruction ever made. Put in your earplugs as we fire the Parrot, Big Bertha, Gustav, and Atomic Annie, among others.

Mon 27th February

Dogfights

January 1, 1945: a damp, frigid morning in northeast Belgium. American airmen tend to the routine flight operations of Y-29, a forward air base within kilometres of the front-line. A light dusting of snow and ice clings to the pierced steel-plank runway and the pine trees that surround the air base. This will be the site of one of the greatest dogfights in history.

Mon 27th February

The Secrets of Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall in the north of England, one of the unsung wonders of the ancient world. It's unique, a spectacular and complex stone barrier measuring 74 miles long, 15 feet high and 10 feet wide. For 300 years it stood as the Roman Empire's most imposing frontier. Hadrian's wall is not only an amazing feat of engineering, it's so important that it's been given the status of a world heritage site, but it's also an incredible time capsule, a window into the human past.

Mon 27th February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team are invited to investigate a Bedfordshire field by a keen group of amateur archaeologists who also just happen to be some of the country's leading experts in the science of ice-cream. Over the years, in the spare minutes between testing wafers, cornets and vanilla flavours, they've found countless pieces of Roman pottery, coins and building material. The field is thought to have once been home to a grand Roman villa. However, the dig proves to be a tough one, with the trench failing to deliver the evidence that everyone was expecting.

Mon 27th February

Evening

The American West

The invention of electricity symbolises a new era, and as America continues to modernise and become increasingly reliant on Western resources, the outlaw elements and the lawless west can no longer be tolerated. Jesse James and Billy the Kid meet and part ways, but when Jesse returns to robbing trains, he discovers that America has changed, and the Governor of Missouri puts a $10,000 bounty on his head. In New Mexico, a powerful cattle baron arranges the election of a sheriff with one purpose: capturing Billy the Kid. And in Tombstone, in an effort to solve a stagecoach robbery, lawman Wyatt Earp makes an ill-fated deal that will bring him to violent showdown at the O.K. Corral.

Mon 27th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. And Marine Ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Mon 27th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Mon 27th February

Nelson In His Own Words

Warrior, hero, lover. Lord Horatio Nelson, one of Britain's greatest war heroes is best known as the man on top of a huge column in London's Trafalgar Square. One of history's most celebrated characters, his achievements are well known, the Battle of Trafalgar and the Nile campaign, as well as his extraordinary record as a commander and a leader of men. But what about Nelson 'the man'? Polite English society was shocked when a batch of letters from Lord Nelson to his mistress, married society beauty Emma Hamilton was made public. They revealed another side to Nelson, the man who crushed French naval power. The letters revealed a man of romantic passion and lustful desire. This exciting film draws on this vast collection of personal correspondence to present Nelson in a new light: a strong commander, an extraordinary strategist, but at the same time vain, impulsive and sexual.

Mon 27th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. And Marine Ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Mon 27th February

Rise of the Continents

Millions of years ago, the Earth looked like something from another solar system. The continents we know today were concentrated into a single landmass - Pangaea - surrounded by Panthalassa, an immense ocean. But about 200 million years ago, this supercontinent started to break apart: new ocean basins were forming, mountains rocketed skywards and over millions of years, seven new landmasses were created from the remnants of the old, each one unique - our continents. Piecing together clues from across the globe and using cutting edge CGI, this puts the giant jigsaw puzzle of Pangaea back together; uncovering the turbulent story of each continent and Spectacular aerial shots reveal the beauty and astonishing landscapes that resulted from the breakup and collision of whole continents, while underwater footage captures the world's most biodiverse seas and smoking volcanoes in the darkest depths of the ocean, revealing why each one is so unique.

Tue 28th February

Morning

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. And Marine Ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Tue 28th February

Dogfights

January 1, 1945: a damp, frigid morning in northeast Belgium. American airmen tend to the routine flight operations of Y-29, a forward air base within kilometres of the front-line. A light dusting of snow and ice clings to the pierced steel-plank runway and the pine trees that surround the air base. This will be the site of one of the greatest dogfights in history.

Tue 28th February

Secrets of War

It was a tremendous booty prized by Hitler as much as territory: the priceless art, personal assets and national treasuries of an entire continent. The organised plunder of these riches would become the most enormous heist in history, amounting to a vast hoard lost in the fog of war. These are the trails of the spoils of war and Nazi gold.

Tue 28th February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team are invited to investigate a Bedfordshire field by a keen group of amateur archaeologists who also just happen to be some of the country's leading experts in the science of ice-cream. Over the years, in the spare minutes between testing wafers, cornets and vanilla flavours, they've found countless pieces of Roman pottery, coins and building material. The field is thought to have once been home to a grand Roman villa. However, the dig proves to be a tough one, with the trench failing to deliver the evidence that everyone was expecting.

Tue 28th February

The Secrets of Hadrian's Wall

Hadrian's Wall in the north of England, one of the unsung wonders of the ancient world. It's unique, a spectacular and complex stone barrier measuring 74 miles long, 15 feet high and 10 feet wide. For 300 years it stood as the Roman Empire's most imposing frontier. Hadrian's wall is not only an amazing feat of engineering, it's so important that it's been given the status of a world heritage site, but it's also an incredible time capsule, a window into the human past.

Tue 28th February

Rise of the Continents

Millions of years ago, the Earth looked like something from another solar system. The continents we know today were concentrated into a single landmass - Pangaea - surrounded by Panthalassa, an immense ocean. But about 200 million years ago, this supercontinent started to break apart: new ocean basins were forming, mountains rocketed skywards and over millions of years, seven new landmasses were created from the remnants of the old, each one unique - our continents. Piecing together clues from across the globe and using cutting edge CGI, this puts the giant jigsaw puzzle of Pangaea back together; uncovering the turbulent story of each continent and Spectacular aerial shots reveal the beauty and astonishing landscapes that resulted from the breakup and collision of whole continents, while underwater footage captures the world's most biodiverse seas and smoking volcanoes in the darkest depths of the ocean, revealing why each one is so unique.

Tue 28th February

Nelson In His Own Words

Warrior, hero, lover. Lord Horatio Nelson, one of Britain's greatest war heroes is best known as the man on top of a huge column in London's Trafalgar Square. One of history's most celebrated characters, his achievements are well known, the Battle of Trafalgar and the Nile campaign, as well as his extraordinary record as a commander and a leader of men. But what about Nelson 'the man'? Polite English society was shocked when a batch of letters from Lord Nelson to his mistress, married society beauty Emma Hamilton was made public. They revealed another side to Nelson, the man who crushed French naval power. The letters revealed a man of romantic passion and lustful desire. This exciting film draws on this vast collection of personal correspondence to present Nelson in a new light: a strong commander, an extraordinary strategist, but at the same time vain, impulsive and sexual.

Tue 28th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Tue 28th February

Rise of the Continents

Millions of years ago, the Earth looked like something from another solar system. The continents we know today were concentrated into a single landmass - Pangaea - surrounded by Panthalassa, an immense ocean. But about 200 million years ago, this supercontinent started to break apart: new ocean basins were forming, mountains rocketed skywards and over millions of years, seven new landmasses were created from the remnants of the old, each one unique - our continents. Piecing together clues from across the globe and using cutting edge CGI, this puts the giant jigsaw puzzle of Pangaea back together; uncovering the turbulent story of each continent and Spectacular aerial shots reveal the beauty and astonishing landscapes that resulted from the breakup and collision of whole continents, while underwater footage captures the world's most biodiverse seas and smoking volcanoes in the darkest depths of the ocean, revealing why each one is so unique.

Tue 28th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. And Marine Ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Tue 28th February

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team are invited to investigate a Bedfordshire field by a keen group of amateur archaeologists who also just happen to be some of the country's leading experts in the science of ice-cream. Over the years, in the spare minutes between testing wafers, cornets and vanilla flavours, they've found countless pieces of Roman pottery, coins and building material. The field is thought to have once been home to a grand Roman villa. However, the dig proves to be a tough one, with the trench failing to deliver the evidence that everyone was expecting.

Tue 28th February

The American West

The invention of electricity symbolises a new era, and as America continues to modernise and become increasingly reliant on Western resources, the outlaw elements and the lawless west can no longer be tolerated. Jesse James and Billy the Kid meet and part ways, but when Jesse returns to robbing trains, he discovers that America has changed, and the Governor of Missouri puts a $10,000 bounty on his head. In New Mexico, a powerful cattle baron arranges the election of a sheriff with one purpose: capturing Billy the Kid. And in Tombstone, in an effort to solve a stagecoach robbery, lawman Wyatt Earp makes an ill-fated deal that will bring him to violent showdown at the O.K. Corral.

Tue 28th February

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Tue 28th February

Noon

Nelson In His Own Words

Warrior, hero, lover. Lord Horatio Nelson, one of Britain's greatest war heroes is best known as the man on top of a huge column in London's Trafalgar Square. One of history's most celebrated characters, his achievements are well known, the Battle of Trafalgar and the Nile campaign, as well as his extraordinary record as a commander and a leader of men. But what about Nelson 'the man'? Polite English society was shocked when a batch of letters from Lord Nelson to his mistress, married society beauty Emma Hamilton was made public. They revealed another side to Nelson, the man who crushed French naval power. The letters revealed a man of romantic passion and lustful desire. This exciting film draws on this vast collection of personal correspondence to present Nelson in a new light: a strong commander, an extraordinary strategist, but at the same time vain, impulsive and sexual.

Tue 28th February

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. And Marine Ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Tue 28th February

Tales of the Gun

Without ammunition, guns are little more than finely machined clubs. From the earliest hand-cast lead shot to the finest factory-made centerfire cartridges, it's ammo that makes a firearm sing. For 500 years, ammo makers have tried to construct bullets so they're easier to carry, quicker to load, and more powerful than the enemy's.

Tue 28th February

Dogfights

At the end of the Vietnam War, the USS Midway's pilots and airmen engaged in some of the most thrilling and intense air combat. Six F4 Phantoms launched from the deck of the USS Midway engage with North Vietnamese MiGs. The Phantoms destroy two MiGs. Watch as American pilots Bartholomay and Arwood down enemy MiG-19s over their home base at Kep. Then flight lead Vic Kovaleski brings down a MiG-17, scoring the last MiG kill of the war. Midway served honourably throughout Vietnam and even in Desert Storm, but time finally caught up with her, and the USS Midway was converted to a museum and now resides in San Diego, California.

Tue 28th February

Secrets of the Manor House

One hundred years ago, the British manor house was in its heyday, sheltering families of enormous wealth and privilege within its stately walls. But what was really going on behind closed doors, where these wealthy families and their poor servants coexisted? Secrets of the Manor House goes inside two of Britain's most legendary manor houses, Manderston in Berwickshire and Dunham Massey, former home of the Earl of Stamford. During the Edwardian era, behind the facades of these great houses, a hidden army of up to 300 servants tended to every need of an aristocratic family. In 1901, there were more than 1.5 million servants in Britain and grand estates occupied half the land. The tradition of primogeniture ensured that they were handed down to the first-born son. Land was power and wealth, and not only did the first-born son inherit the land, he inherited the title of earl, marquess, or duke, and the political power that accompanied it. And like their masters, the serving classes in the great manor houses also adhered to a well-defined ranking system. This film features some of the premiere historians of the Edwardian era, including Lawrence James. As he and others explain, by Edwardian times the agricultural revenues of the great country estates were dwindling. With the Industrial Revolution, wealth began moving away from agriculture and into manufacturing and banking. While the easiest solution would have been to sell some of their land, the practice of entailment demanded that estates be passed on intact. Many aristocrats, finding themselves in need of cash, married rich American heiresses in a trend that was quietly called "cash for titles." As historian Dr. Elisabeth Kehoe recounts, among the many American heiresses who married into the aristocracy was Jennie Jerome, who wed the second son of the Duke of Marlborough and was mother to Winston Churchill.

Tue 28th February

Time Team

The team descend on a tiny Cornish island that legend says was once visited by Jesus Christ. With such a claim to fame, the tiny chapel on Looe Island became a magnet for medieval pilgrims, and many perished on the short but treacherous crossing from the mainland. In a dig frustrated by rising tides and the discovery of mystery burials, archaeologists piece together evidence of one of Britain's earliest Christian sites.

Tue 28th February

Evening

Penelope Keith's Hidden Villages

Penelope begins her journey with a trip to East Anglia. While there, she attends a regatta on the Norfolk Broads, takes to the skies over the village of Little Snoring and learns to speak like a native of the county.

Tue 28th February

Secrets of the Colosseum

The Colosseum is one of the most iconic buildings of the ancient world and it stands as a monument to Roman imperial power and cruelty. The spectacles staged here involved the killing of tens of thousands of gladiators, prisoners, and wild animals. Records of these games brag of seemingly impossible acts - beasts magically appearing on stage and water flash-flooding the arena so that full-sized ships could engage in sea battles. Were the Romans exaggerating or did they truly achieve these feats? Until now, experts have been dubious - but what if these aren't tall tales? Now, a team of modern builders and engineers test their theories by building a trap door-pulley system capable of lifting a beast into the Colosseum. Do they have what it takes to replicate the innovation and ingenuity of the Romans?

Tue 28th February

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Tue 28th February

Dunkirk: Battle, Evacuation, Triumph

"The situation was incomparably worse than we had imagined", Winston Churchill. In May 1940, Britain faced a military disaster. Outgunned and outmanoeuvred, young soldiers fought a desperate retreat as the Nazi war machine closed in. Trapped around the port of Dunkirk, the Army waited for rescue without food, supplies or hope. What happened next is the stuff of legend - a bold seafaring operation which turned defeat into triumph. Featuring rare archive footage from New Classics, the historical collection from ITN Source.

Tue 28th February

Hidden Histories: WW1's Forgotten Photos

In the centenary year, Hidden Histories reveals World War One from a new and surprising perspective - through the eyes of the men who fought in it. This is the extraordinary untold story of First World War soldiers' photography.These soldiers marched off to war with secret 'vest pocket' cameras, determined to record what they thought would be a great adventure. Few were prepared for the horrors they were about to witness - and photograph. Their photos - many never seen before in public - provide a deeply moving document of their lives in the trenches and their rapid loss of innocence. With no soldier photographer alive to tell the tale, we join their close relatives on emotional journeys of discovery as they go in search of the secrets hidden within their ancestors' photographs.

Tue 28th February

Science and the Swastika

Germans are known for their high standards and attention to detail. From early progress in the link between smoking and cancer, to triumphs in aviation - their scientists have been among the greatest in the world. This program examines the effect Hitler's Nazi regime had on the scientific progress in the country, from world leaders to crumbled ruins.

Wed 1st March

Morning

Tales of the Gun

Without ammunition, guns are little more than finely machined clubs. From the earliest hand-cast lead shot to the finest factory-made centerfire cartridges, it's ammo that makes a firearm sing. For 500 years, ammo makers have tried to construct bullets so they're easier to carry, quicker to load, and more powerful than the enemy's.

Wed 1st March

Dogfights

At the end of the Vietnam War, the USS Midway's pilots and airmen engaged in some of the most thrilling and intense air combat. Six F4 Phantoms launched from the deck of the USS Midway engage with North Vietnamese MiGs. The Phantoms destroy two MiGs. Watch as American pilots Bartholomay and Arwood down enemy MiG-19s over their home base at Kep. Then flight lead Vic Kovaleski brings down a MiG-17, scoring the last MiG kill of the war. Midway served honourably throughout Vietnam and even in Desert Storm, but time finally caught up with her, and the USS Midway was converted to a museum and now resides in San Diego, California.

Wed 1st March

Secrets of War

The struggle for the Atlantic pitted Germany's lethal U-boat fleet against every weapon the Allies could muster to protect their vital supply routes to Great Britain. This is the story of naval intelligence, code-breaking and code-stealing in the Battle of the Atlantic.

Wed 1st March

Time Team

The team descend on a tiny Cornish island that legend says was once visited by Jesus Christ. With such a claim to fame, the tiny chapel on Looe Island became a magnet for medieval pilgrims, and many perished on the short but treacherous crossing from the mainland. In a dig frustrated by rising tides and the discovery of mystery burials, archaeologists piece together evidence of one of Britain's earliest Christian sites.

Wed 1st March

Secrets of the Colosseum

The Colosseum is one of the most iconic buildings of the ancient world and it stands as a monument to Roman imperial power and cruelty. The spectacles staged here involved the killing of tens of thousands of gladiators, prisoners, and wild animals. Records of these games brag of seemingly impossible acts - beasts magically appearing on stage and water flash-flooding the arena so that full-sized ships could engage in sea battles. Were the Romans exaggerating or did they truly achieve these feats? Until now, experts have been dubious - but what if these aren't tall tales? Now, a team of modern builders and engineers test their theories by building a trap door-pulley system capable of lifting a beast into the Colosseum. Do they have what it takes to replicate the innovation and ingenuity of the Romans?

Wed 1st March

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Wed 1st March

Dunkirk: Battle, Evacuation, Triumph

"The situation was incomparably worse than we had imagined", Winston Churchill. In May 1940, Britain faced a military disaster. Outgunned and outmanoeuvred, young soldiers fought a desperate retreat as the Nazi war machine closed in. Trapped around the port of Dunkirk, the Army waited for rescue without food, supplies or hope. What happened next is the stuff of legend - a bold seafaring operation which turned defeat into triumph. Featuring rare archive footage from New Classics, the historical collection from ITN Source.

Wed 1st March

Hidden Histories: WW1's Forgotten Photos

In the centenary year, Hidden Histories reveals World War One from a new and surprising perspective - through the eyes of the men who fought in it. This is the extraordinary untold story of First World War soldiers' photography.These soldiers marched off to war with secret 'vest pocket' cameras, determined to record what they thought would be a great adventure. Few were prepared for the horrors they were about to witness - and photograph. Their photos - many never seen before in public - provide a deeply moving document of their lives in the trenches and their rapid loss of innocence. With no soldier photographer alive to tell the tale, we join their close relatives on emotional journeys of discovery as they go in search of the secrets hidden within their ancestors' photographs.

Wed 1st March

Science and the Swastika

Germans are known for their high standards and attention to detail. From early progress in the link between smoking and cancer, to triumphs in aviation - their scientists have been among the greatest in the world. This program examines the effect Hitler's Nazi regime had on the scientific progress in the country, from world leaders to crumbled ruins.

Wed 1st March

Secrets of the Manor House

One hundred years ago, the British manor house was in its heyday, sheltering families of enormous wealth and privilege within its stately walls. But what was really going on behind closed doors, where these wealthy families and their poor servants coexisted? Secrets of the Manor House goes inside two of Britain's most legendary manor houses, Manderston in Berwickshire and Dunham Massey, former home of the Earl of Stamford. During the Edwardian era, behind the facades of these great houses, a hidden army of up to 300 servants tended to every need of an aristocratic family. In 1901, there were more than 1.5 million servants in Britain and grand estates occupied half the land. The tradition of primogeniture ensured that they were handed down to the first-born son. Land was power and wealth, and not only did the first-born son inherit the land, he inherited the title of earl, marquess, or duke, and the political power that accompanied it. And like their masters, the serving classes in the great manor houses also adhered to a well-defined ranking system. This film features some of the premiere historians of the Edwardian era, including Lawrence James. As he and others explain, by Edwardian times the agricultural revenues of the great country estates were dwindling. With the Industrial Revolution, wealth began moving away from agriculture and into manufacturing and banking. While the easiest solution would have been to sell some of their land, the practice of entailment demanded that estates be passed on intact. Many aristocrats, finding themselves in need of cash, married rich American heiresses in a trend that was quietly called "cash for titles." As historian Dr. Elisabeth Kehoe recounts, among the many American heiresses who married into the aristocracy was Jennie Jerome, who wed the second son of the Duke of Marlborough and was mother to Winston Churchill.

Wed 1st March

Time Team

The team descend on a tiny Cornish island that legend says was once visited by Jesus Christ. With such a claim to fame, the tiny chapel on Looe Island became a magnet for medieval pilgrims, and many perished on the short but treacherous crossing from the mainland. In a dig frustrated by rising tides and the discovery of mystery burials, archaeologists piece together evidence of one of Britain's earliest Christian sites.

Wed 1st March

Penelope Keith's Hidden Villages

Penelope begins her journey with a trip to East Anglia. While there, she attends a regatta on the Norfolk Broads, takes to the skies over the village of Little Snoring and learns to speak like a native of the county.

Wed 1st March

Secrets of the Colosseum

The Colosseum is one of the most iconic buildings of the ancient world and it stands as a monument to Roman imperial power and cruelty. The spectacles staged here involved the killing of tens of thousands of gladiators, prisoners, and wild animals. Records of these games brag of seemingly impossible acts - beasts magically appearing on stage and water flash-flooding the arena so that full-sized ships could engage in sea battles. Were the Romans exaggerating or did they truly achieve these feats? Until now, experts have been dubious - but what if these aren't tall tales? Now, a team of modern builders and engineers test their theories by building a trap door-pulley system capable of lifting a beast into the Colosseum. Do they have what it takes to replicate the innovation and ingenuity of the Romans?

Wed 1st March

Noon

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Wed 1st March

Dunkirk: Battle, Evacuation, Triumph

"The situation was incomparably worse than we had imagined", Winston Churchill. In May 1940, Britain faced a military disaster. Outgunned and outmanoeuvred, young soldiers fought a desperate retreat as the Nazi war machine closed in. Trapped around the port of Dunkirk, the Army waited for rescue without food, supplies or hope. What happened next is the stuff of legend - a bold seafaring operation which turned defeat into triumph. Featuring rare archive footage from New Classics, the historical collection from ITN Source.

Wed 1st March

Tales of the Gun

This program relates the story of the birth and development of rapid fire weapons from the 14th-century until the end of World War I - where on one terrible day the machine gun was responsible for moving down nearly 60,000 men.

Wed 1st March

Dogfights

In the aerial battleground of World War II, the P-51 Mustang proved itself to be the most famous war bird in history. Take a look at three of its most memorable battles. On November 2, 1944, Capt. Donald Bryan leads a group of P-51s escorting B-24 bombers to their target deep inside of Germany when he runs into a huge gaggle of Me109s on the attack. On June 23, 1945, Second Lieutenant Bob Scamara takes off with a flight of Mustangs from Iwo Jima. His group is jumped by seventeen Zeroes. On April 7, 1945, pilot Richard Candelaria becomes one of the first Americans to face the jet menace.

Wed 1st March

Underground Britain

This is an alternative odyssey through the labyrinth that lies beneath us, an exploration of Britain's underground world that few have ever seen - an adventurous and revealing journey into entire underground cities, priest holes, smugglers' hideaways, secret society banqueting halls, crypts, catacombs and cold war installations - even an extraordinary labyrinth. Underground Britain is a nationwide journey through the most remarkable and ingenious man-made underground locations in the UK. We will climb through manhole covers, abseil into gigantic mines and creep into the caverns of 18th century hell raisers. A nation of burrowers, the British have tunneled their way underneath cities and landscapes for generations and continue to do so today. From failed attempts to build the first Channel Tunnel, to carving out great subterranean crypts, planting surreal and eccentric underground gardens and forging the nation's great transportation networks - welcome to a mole's-eye view of Britain. Explore the depths of every site - mapping its furthest reaches to investigate every aspect, from secret hideaways to vast ballrooms. Discover the history and creation of these underground sites. How and why were these great subterranean enterprises created and what's happening to them now? Meet the people who are part of the story of the place - miners, top secret workers, drivers and restorers - to explore some of the amazing narratives about what happened beneath the surface and the work that is continuing today. Visit sites that are still in operation today, meeting the people whose daily work is underground; from "fluffers" on the Tube to the people who keep our sewers flowing at the height of the floods.

Wed 1st March

Time Team

Forsaking the usual attractions of a muddy field, Tony Robinson and the team don their wigs and best suits in the hope of blending in with the posh surroundings of Lincoln's Inn in London. Amid the grand buildings that make up one of the world's oldest and most distinguished law societies, they have been asked to discover the remains of a 13th-century palace that belonged to Henry III's Lord Chancellor.

Wed 1st March

Evening

1929

A documentary exploring the causes of the 1929 Wall Street Crash, a financial disaster that we hoped could never happen again.

Wed 1st March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Wed 1st March

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Wed 1st March

The Sinking of the Royal Oak

We tell the full story of the sinking of the Royal Oak. We reveal how one of the most daring raids of World War Two became shrouded in controversy, how it led to the largest single loss of boy-sailors in the Royal Navy's history, and how British complacency handed Hitler his first great propaganda victory of the war.

Wed 1st March

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Wed 1st March

East to West

This spectacular episode explores the extraordinary powers and civilisations that have emerged from central Asia. First the Seljuk Turks took on the Byzantines, pushing their way into Anatolia. In a cave in Cappadocia we discover a long lost painting that reveals how the two cultures co-existed. Then we follow the Mongol invasions - in Bukhara we explore its destruction and in Esfahan, Iran we see how the Mongols eventually converted to Islam and began to settle. Then in Uzbekistan again the film traces the rise of Timur and explores the glories of Samarkand. Finally the programme follows the successors of Timur as they spread south into India, creating the wonders of the Mughal Empire. The film ends at the Taj Mahal. For the first time, the story of the birth and flourishing of civilization in the Near and Middle East and it's huge influence on the West. Much of what happened in the West was only on the margins of the real engine room of artistic, religious and social evolution. For crucial phases in world history the key place was the Middle East - an extraordinary region that for millennia has been a political, economic and cultural centre of the world and a bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa and Europe. For the foundation of science, justice, monotheism, commerce, civil rights and artistic expression - look Eastward. This is a complex truth; it encompasses vast Empires, reveals amassed libraries of manuscripts, assesses the Conquests period, the Ottomans and the Renaissance, travels the Silk Route, and covers three continents. From the ancient to the modern world, this series will be an epic journey of discovery, following a river flowing from the East to the West.

Thu 2nd March

Morning

Tales of the Gun

This program relates the story of the birth and development of rapid fire weapons from the 14th-century until the end of World War I - where on one terrible day the machine gun was responsible for moving down nearly 60,000 men.

Thu 2nd March

Dogfights

In the aerial battleground of World War II, the P-51 Mustang proved itself to be the most famous war bird in history. Take a look at three of its most memorable battles. On November 2, 1944, Capt. Donald Bryan leads a group of P-51s escorting B-24 bombers to their target deep inside of Germany when he runs into a huge gaggle of Me109s on the attack. On June 23, 1945, Second Lieutenant Bob Scamara takes off with a flight of Mustangs from Iwo Jima. His group is jumped by seventeen Zeroes. On April 7, 1945, pilot Richard Candelaria becomes one of the first Americans to face the jet menace.

Thu 2nd March

Secrets of War

Hitler's lightening strike in Poland soon gave way to a strange eight-month waiting game. Blitzkrieg became Sitzkrieg, a declared but not yet fought battle allowing spies, diplomats, agents of influence, intelligence officers, opportunists, charlatans and statesmen to make their moves. From the rape of Poland to the fall of France, these are the secrets of Sitzkrieg.

Thu 2nd March

Time Team

Forsaking the usual attractions of a muddy field, Tony Robinson and the team don their wigs and best suits in the hope of blending in with the posh surroundings of Lincoln's Inn in London. Amid the grand buildings that make up one of the world's oldest and most distinguished law societies, they have been asked to discover the remains of a 13th-century palace that belonged to Henry III's Lord Chancellor.

Thu 2nd March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Thu 2nd March

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Thu 2nd March

The Sinking of the Royal Oak

We tell the full story of the sinking of the Royal Oak. We reveal how one of the most daring raids of World War Two became shrouded in controversy, how it led to the largest single loss of boy-sailors in the Royal Navy's history, and how British complacency handed Hitler his first great propaganda victory of the war.

Thu 2nd March

What The Hell Is The Presidency For?

Lyndon Baines Johnson passed some of the most important civil rights legislation of the 1960s that still affects Americans today. Discover how he used the power of the presidency to strike deals, make trades and form an alliance with Martin Luther King Jr to bring civil rights to the forefront of American politics.

Thu 2nd March

East to West

This spectacular episode explores the extraordinary powers and civilisations that have emerged from central Asia. First the Seljuk Turks took on the Byzantines, pushing their way into Anatolia. In a cave in Cappadocia we discover a long lost painting that reveals how the two cultures co-existed. Then we follow the Mongol invasions - in Bukhara we explore its destruction and in Esfahan, Iran we see how the Mongols eventually converted to Islam and began to settle. Then in Uzbekistan again the film traces the rise of Timur and explores the glories of Samarkand. Finally the programme follows the successors of Timur as they spread south into India, creating the wonders of the Mughal Empire. The film ends at the Taj Mahal. For the first time, the story of the birth and flourishing of civilization in the Near and Middle East and it's huge influence on the West. Much of what happened in the West was only on the margins of the real engine room of artistic, religious and social evolution. For crucial phases in world history the key place was the Middle East - an extraordinary region that for millennia has been a political, economic and cultural centre of the world and a bridge between the continents of Asia, Africa and Europe. For the foundation of science, justice, monotheism, commerce, civil rights and artistic expression - look Eastward. This is a complex truth; it encompasses vast Empires, reveals amassed libraries of manuscripts, assesses the Conquests period, the Ottomans and the Renaissance, travels the Silk Route, and covers three continents. From the ancient to the modern world, this series will be an epic journey of discovery, following a river flowing from the East to the West.

Thu 2nd March

Underground Britain

This is an alternative odyssey through the labyrinth that lies beneath us, an exploration of Britain's underground world that few have ever seen - an adventurous and revealing journey into entire underground cities, priest holes, smugglers' hideaways, secret society banqueting halls, crypts, catacombs and cold war installations - even an extraordinary labyrinth. Underground Britain is a nationwide journey through the most remarkable and ingenious man-made underground locations in the UK. We will climb through manhole covers, abseil into gigantic mines and creep into the caverns of 18th century hell raisers. A nation of burrowers, the British have tunneled their way underneath cities and landscapes for generations and continue to do so today. From failed attempts to build the first Channel Tunnel, to carving out great subterranean crypts, planting surreal and eccentric underground gardens and forging the nation's great transportation networks - welcome to a mole's-eye view of Britain. Explore the depths of every site - mapping its furthest reaches to investigate every aspect, from secret hideaways to vast ballrooms. Discover the history and creation of these underground sites. How and why were these great subterranean enterprises created and what's happening to them now? Meet the people who are part of the story of the place - miners, top secret workers, drivers and restorers - to explore some of the amazing narratives about what happened beneath the surface and the work that is continuing today. Visit sites that are still in operation today, meeting the people whose daily work is underground; from "fluffers" on the Tube to the people who keep our sewers flowing at the height of the floods.

Thu 2nd March

Time Team

Forsaking the usual attractions of a muddy field, Tony Robinson and the team don their wigs and best suits in the hope of blending in with the posh surroundings of Lincoln's Inn in London. Amid the grand buildings that make up one of the world's oldest and most distinguished law societies, they have been asked to discover the remains of a 13th-century palace that belonged to Henry III's Lord Chancellor.

Thu 2nd March

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Thu 2nd March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Thu 2nd March

Noon

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Thu 2nd March

The Sinking of the Royal Oak

We tell the full story of the sinking of the Royal Oak. We reveal how one of the most daring raids of World War Two became shrouded in controversy, how it led to the largest single loss of boy-sailors in the Royal Navy's history, and how British complacency handed Hitler his first great propaganda victory of the war.

Thu 2nd March

Tales of the Gun

From the day that European soldiers first squared off with powder and ball, the need for a weapon that could be loaded once, and fired often, became abundantly clear. We'll see how, over the course of centuries, revolving cylinder pistols evolved from gilded playthings of royalty into the deadly handguns of two world wars.

Thu 2nd March

Dogfights

In the fighter pilot business, they say speed is life. Speed means the ability to manoeuvre. Speed is the initiative in a dogfight, with the speed advantage you can almost always outperform and out think your opponent. From the era of piston-driven, prop planes like the F4U Corsair to high-performance jets like the F-86 Sabre and the F4 Phantom, the pursuit of greater speed has defined the development of aircraft.

Thu 2nd March

Sparks Of Invention

From the flashes of genius to the hard-won discoveries after many years of trial and error, this enlightening series explores the stories behind many of the inventions we take for granted today.

Thu 2nd March

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team brave the elements in East Anglia to investigate a mysterious site that may have been a spiritual centre for thousands of years. Chapel Hill, set in the windswept expanse of the Fens, is one of the smallest hills in the country and continues to baffle archaeologists. As the dig begins and finds are uncovered, the site's history is slowly revealed.

Thu 2nd March

Evening

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centers, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers-a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Thu 2nd March

History's Greatest Hoaxes

This is one of the great hoax-or-not hoax stories; the best-selling book by Henry Charrierre, which told of his life on the Penal colony island of French Guiana was exposed as a novel, not a biography, by Gerrard de Villiers in 1970. But Charrierre refused to accept that he'd been rumbled and tried to get De Villiers's book Papillon Pinned banned, despite the very compelling proof facing him, not least that provided by other prisoners on the island. The historical sub plots to this fascinating episode are the harsh - some say inhuman - conditions on Devil's Island which gave birth to the book, fact or fiction, and the wider story of the penal colony system.

Thu 2nd March

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Few know that one of the United States' most mysterious National Parks is not even in the Continental US. It's El Yunque, in Puerto Rico, and some believe its a home to a terrifying creature called Chucabara. This violent monster has attacked animals and occasionally, humans in the near El Yunque, and some believe it may be some kind of US military genetic experiment gone wrong. But UFO sightings over the Park suggest an even greater mystery, and possibly a government cover-up of one of the largest hidden research bases in the world.

Thu 2nd March

Unsealed: Conspiracy Files

The past few decades have been filled with stunning technological advancement. But is all this progress good for humanity? Animal cloning has been a reality for decades but the disturbing experiments going on behind close doors will shock you. Human cloning may be much closer than you think.

Thu 2nd March

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Hell fires, endless winters, or a planet wracked by earthquakes are a few versions of Armageddon visualised by the Vikings, Aztecs, and the rest of our ancient ancestors. But which does modern science think will be closest to the truth? Celestial phenomena - the aging of our sun, the expansion of our universe, and other potentially cataclysmic events - could trigger the kind of Armageddon the ancients feared. Which ancient prophecy do scientists believe actually foretells our doom? And how close are we to the end of the world?

Thu 2nd March

Unsealed: Alien Files

It's the ultimate close encounter. There have been thousands of reported cases all over the world. But these claims are almost invariably dismissed by authorities with little or no investigation. Mounting evidence has revealed there may in fact be millions of victims - virtually all unaware they have been taken. What are the telltale signs of abduction? And why do aliens appear determined to keep their activities secret? From of lost time and recovered memories to terrifying accounts of alien surgery, join us as we reveal the hidden signs of alien abduction.

Thu 2nd March

The Conspiracy Show

Who was really behind a series of revolts, protests, and uprisings that swept the Middle East starting in late 2010? Did social networking students and young professionals really inspire these revolutions, or were these insurgencies funded and orchestrated by the US State Department, Wall Street and NATO? Two journalists and an independent researcher/broadcaster argue the Arab Spring was more about the US State Department's desire to create client states than supporting democratic reforms.

Thu 2nd March

The Universe

One of the universe's most enduring mysteries is time travel. This episode explores the possibilities. Discover why time travel into the future is unavoidable in the Einsteinian world of Relativity. As for the past, the laws of physics do not tell us it's impossible, but the bizarre consequences of going into the past and altering the future make for mind-bending science. Finally, go for the future by travelling to the nearest star, 4.3 light-years away, in only 45 days. The destination may be an Earth-like planet - a planet scientists are now hunting for and may find in the next few years.

Fri 3rd March

Morning

Tales of the Gun

From the day that European soldiers first squared off with powder and ball, the need for a weapon that could be loaded once, and fired often, became abundantly clear. We'll see how, over the course of centuries, revolving cylinder pistols evolved from gilded playthings of royalty into the deadly handguns of two world wars.

Fri 3rd March

Dogfights

In the fighter pilot business, they say speed is life. Speed means the ability to manoeuvre. Speed is the initiative in a dogfight, with the speed advantage you can almost always outperform and out think your opponent. From the era of piston-driven, prop planes like the F4U Corsair to high-performance jets like the F-86 Sabre and the F4 Phantom, the pursuit of greater speed has defined the development of aircraft.

Fri 3rd March

Secrets of War

June 1940: England stands alone against brutal aggression. The Germans have yet to be stopped in their lightening thrust across Europe. The British are outnumbered, but they have a secret weapon four years in the making. There were only 500 RAF fighter pilots in the Battle of Britain, but behind them, deep in the shadows of war, over 10,000 special men and women fought the battle of Ultra, which helped make victory possible.

Fri 3rd March

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team brave the elements in East Anglia to investigate a mysterious site that may have been a spiritual centre for thousands of years. Chapel Hill, set in the windswept expanse of the Fens, is one of the smallest hills in the country and continues to baffle archaeologists. As the dig begins and finds are uncovered, the site's history is slowly revealed.

Fri 3rd March

History's Greatest Hoaxes

This is one of the great hoax-or-not hoax stories; the best-selling book by Henry Charrierre, which told of his life on the Penal colony island of French Guiana was exposed as a novel, not a biography, by Gerrard de Villiers in 1970. But Charrierre refused to accept that he'd been rumbled and tried to get De Villiers's book Papillon Pinned banned, despite the very compelling proof facing him, not least that provided by other prisoners on the island. The historical sub plots to this fascinating episode are the harsh - some say inhuman - conditions on Devil's Island which gave birth to the book, fact or fiction, and the wider story of the penal colony system.

Fri 3rd March

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Few know that one of the United States' most mysterious National Parks is not even in the Continental US. It's El Yunque, in Puerto Rico, and some believe its a home to a terrifying creature called Chucabara. This violent monster has attacked animals and occasionally, humans in the near El Yunque, and some believe it may be some kind of US military genetic experiment gone wrong. But UFO sightings over the Park suggest an even greater mystery, and possibly a government cover-up of one of the largest hidden research bases in the world.

Fri 3rd March

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Hell fires, endless winters, or a planet wracked by earthquakes are a few versions of Armageddon visualised by the Vikings, Aztecs, and the rest of our ancient ancestors. But which does modern science think will be closest to the truth? Celestial phenomena - the aging of our sun, the expansion of our universe, and other potentially cataclysmic events - could trigger the kind of Armageddon the ancients feared. Which ancient prophecy do scientists believe actually foretells our doom? And how close are we to the end of the world?

Fri 3rd March

Unsealed: Alien Files

It's the ultimate close encounter. There have been thousands of reported cases all over the world. But these claims are almost invariably dismissed by authorities with little or no investigation. Mounting evidence has revealed there may in fact be millions of victims - virtually all unaware they have been taken. What are the telltale signs of abduction? And why do aliens appear determined to keep their activities secret? From of lost time and recovered memories to terrifying accounts of alien surgery, join us as we reveal the hidden signs of alien abduction.

Fri 3rd March

The Conspiracy Show

Who was really behind a series of revolts, protests, and uprisings that swept the Middle East starting in late 2010? Did social networking students and young professionals really inspire these revolutions, or were these insurgencies funded and orchestrated by the US State Department, Wall Street and NATO? Two journalists and an independent researcher/broadcaster argue the Arab Spring was more about the US State Department's desire to create client states than supporting democratic reforms.

Fri 3rd March

The Universe

One of the universe's most enduring mysteries is time travel. This episode explores the possibilities. Discover why time travel into the future is unavoidable in the Einsteinian world of Relativity. As for the past, the laws of physics do not tell us it's impossible, but the bizarre consequences of going into the past and altering the future make for mind-bending science. Finally, go for the future by travelling to the nearest star, 4.3 light-years away, in only 45 days. The destination may be an Earth-like planet - a planet scientists are now hunting for and may find in the next few years.

Fri 3rd March

Sparks Of Invention

From the flashes of genius to the hard-won discoveries after many years of trial and error, this enlightening series explores the stories behind many of the inventions we take for granted today.

Fri 3rd March

Time Team

Tony Robinson and the team brave the elements in East Anglia to investigate a mysterious site that may have been a spiritual centre for thousands of years. Chapel Hill, set in the windswept expanse of the Fens, is one of the smallest hills in the country and continues to baffle archaeologists. As the dig begins and finds are uncovered, the site's history is slowly revealed.

Fri 3rd March

Genius

In the mid 20th century, the 'computer' was a behemoth - a 2-tonne machine that sat in research labs and university tech centers, inaccessible to the public. But not for long. In the 1980s, Bill Gates and Steve Jobs broke out in a heated battle to bring the computer to the masses. The race is one to see who will run the world's personal computers-a battle in which Jobs' ego may get the best of him.

Fri 3rd March

History's Greatest Hoaxes

This is one of the great hoax-or-not hoax stories; the best-selling book by Henry Charrierre, which told of his life on the Penal colony island of French Guiana was exposed as a novel, not a biography, by Gerrard de Villiers in 1970. But Charrierre refused to accept that he'd been rumbled and tried to get De Villiers's book Papillon Pinned banned, despite the very compelling proof facing him, not least that provided by other prisoners on the island. The historical sub plots to this fascinating episode are the harsh - some say inhuman - conditions on Devil's Island which gave birth to the book, fact or fiction, and the wider story of the penal colony system.

Fri 3rd March

Noon

National Park: Secrets & Legends

Few know that one of the United States' most mysterious National Parks is not even in the Continental US. It's El Yunque, in Puerto Rico, and some believe its a home to a terrifying creature called Chucabara. This violent monster has attacked animals and occasionally, humans in the near El Yunque, and some believe it may be some kind of US military genetic experiment gone wrong. But UFO sightings over the Park suggest an even greater mystery, and possibly a government cover-up of one of the largest hidden research bases in the world.

Fri 3rd March

Unsealed: Conspiracy Files

The past few decades have been filled with stunning technological advancement. But is all this progress good for humanity? Animal cloning has been a reality for decades but the disturbing experiments going on behind close doors will shock you. Human cloning may be much closer than you think.

Fri 3rd March

The Universe: Ancient Mysteries Solved

Hell fires, endless winters, or a planet wracked by earthquakes are a few versions of Armageddon visualised by the Vikings, Aztecs, and the rest of our ancient ancestors. But which does modern science think will be closest to the truth? Celestial phenomena - the aging of our sun, the expansion of our universe, and other potentially cataclysmic events - could trigger the kind of Armageddon the ancients feared. Which ancient prophecy do scientists believe actually foretells our doom? And how close are we to the end of the world?

Fri 3rd March

Tales of the Gun

During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and small towns a like, they earned a fierce reputation in a blaze of bullets. They were the best friends of criminals such as John Dillenger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde. Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy guns, Whippets and Browning automatic rifles.

Fri 3rd March

Dogfights

Machine gun fire rips through the fuselage. Flames fill the cockpit and the aircraft plummets in a wild spin. But time and again the pilot of a P-47 Thunderbolt pulls out and keeps on fighting. Over occupied Europe, the P-47 Thunderbolt blazed a reputation as the most rugged fighter of WWII. Pilot Robert S. Johnson flies with the renowned 56th fighter group. His flight is jumped by 16 deadly Focke-Wulf 190s. As hundreds of enemy rounds impact his fighter, Johnson's life depends on the legendary protection his armoured cockpit affords. In June 1944, Lt. George Sutcliffe enters the fight of his life in an effort to escape 40-plus Me109s looming above him. The Thunderbolt's defensive capabilities inspired confidence in its pilots. But the aircraft was a dog-fighter at heart.

Fri 3rd March

The BBC At War

Hailed and derided in equal measure, the BBC in 1939 had yet to seal its reputation. With the advent of war, the corporation found itself thrust into a battle against the Nazis, and the machinations of the British government. This series examines how the conflict transformed the BBC, what impact its broadcasts had at home and abroad, and uncovers the battles that raged with the government over its independence - out of which was forged the template for the modern BBC. From an early Nazi propaganda coup that forced the BBC into action and how fears of a crisis in morale at home led to class barriers being swept away on the airwaves, to how stubborn determination and technical improvisation enabled broadcasting from the heart of the war zone, we reveal how World War Two was the making of the BBC and nearly its breaking.

Fri 3rd March

Time Team

The distinctive grass-covered remains of the deserted medieval village of Ulnaby are a landmark in the Durham countryside. And although they've been photographed, surveyed and written about, they've never been dug. But now Tony Robinson and the team have been invited to physically unearth the secrets of one of the best-preserved archaeological sites in Britain.

Fri 3rd March

Evening

Coast Australia

In the pristine Kimberley of Western Australia Neil Oliver discovers Broome's dark pearling history and the delicate science of their cultivation. Tim Flannery walks in primeval tracks along the legendary Dinosaur Coast. Xanthe Mallett explores a unique maritime war grave. Brendan Moar learns the art of Indigenous Raft making and Emma Johnston investigates the lush, protected habitat of migratory shorebirds. Finally Neil Oliver wrestles the southern hemisphere's biggest tides at the surging Horizontal Falls, and finally experiences the dreaming stories through a little sacred maintenance on some ancient rock art.

Fri 3rd March

In Search of Ancient Ireland

We begin with a look at the 'heroic age', before the advent of written communication. We succeed in separating fact from fiction in the timeless legends of mighty warriors like Cu Chullain and immortal rulers like Queen Maeve.

Fri 3rd March

Battle of Britain

Brothers Colin and Ewan McGregor take us on a journey to honour the heroes of 1940 both on the ground and in the air, bringing the story of the Battle Of Britain to a new generation. Arguably the most important event in modern British history and the only aerial war in world history.

Fri 3rd March

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Fri 3rd March

Border Country

In this beautifully filmed series, historian Rory Stewart studies the extraordinary landscape, oral history and archaeology of the Anglo-Scottish border, finding parallels with frontiers from Turkey to Nepal. Two thousand years ago, the Romans dominated the world. They divided their northernmost territory with an arbitrary marker; Hadrian's Wall split the communities of Britain in two. Border Country explores the Anglo-Scottish borderlands tumultuous history, learning how this boundary defined the region. Having served as a diplomat in fiercely contested borderlands from Indonesia and the Balkans to Iraq and Afghanistan, Rory has witnessed the effect of artificial frontiers, and the destructive potential of new nationalisms. Drawing on this experience, Rory reveals how borders are forged - both in the land and in our imagination.

Sat 4th March

Morning

America Unearthed

Allegedly, the town of Rockwall, Texas, was built on a massive rock wall that was constructed by some ancient civilisation or giants. Scott Wolter conducts an excavation to figure out who-or what-created this wall.

Sat 4th March

Conspiracy Theory with Jesse Ventura

They're thought to be a group of the world's elite who meet once a year at a luxury hotel and decide how they will run the world. It's believed they plan to thin out the population through disease and vaccines. Jesse Ventura infiltrates the Bilderberg Group.

Sat 4th March

Monsters & Mysteries

In the late 1960's the town of Point Pleasant, West Virginia is besieged by a series of monstrous creatures, blood-seeking UFO's, and mysterious men in black. Two reporters seek answers, culminating in one of the deadliest disasters in US history.

Sat 4th March

UFO Hunters

From microscopic particles to large pieces of unknown metal, UFO 'trace cases' offer some of the most convincing evidence that UFOs may have been visiting Earth for centuries. Our team examines the most compelling relics available. In Pennsylvania, they uncover reports of a UFO spraying a strange blue mist, witnessed by multiple people. They examine a mysterious glass-like rock found in Poland at the scene of a UFO sighting. And in Missouri they meet a man with a unique otherworldly piece of metal he witnessed falling off a UFO. The team will conduct a scientific test, never-before-done on this unidentified metal. The results of this test could be revealing.

Sat 4th March

In Search of Ancient Ireland

We begin with a look at the 'heroic age', before the advent of written communication. We succeed in separating fact from fiction in the timeless legends of mighty warriors like Cu Chullain and immortal rulers like Queen Maeve.

Sat 4th March

Battle of Britain

Brothers Colin and Ewan McGregor take us on a journey to honour the heroes of 1940 both on the ground and in the air, bringing the story of the Battle Of Britain to a new generation. Arguably the most important event in modern British history and the only aerial war in world history.

Sat 4th March

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Sat 4th March

Border Country

In this beautifully filmed series, historian Rory Stewart studies the extraordinary landscape, oral history and archaeology of the Anglo-Scottish border, finding parallels with frontiers from Turkey to Nepal. Two thousand years ago, the Romans dominated the world. They divided their northernmost territory with an arbitrary marker; Hadrian's Wall split the communities of Britain in two. Border Country explores the Anglo-Scottish borderlands tumultuous history, learning how this boundary defined the region. Having served as a diplomat in fiercely contested borderlands from Indonesia and the Balkans to Iraq and Afghanistan, Rory has witnessed the effect of artificial frontiers, and the destructive potential of new nationalisms. Drawing on this experience, Rory reveals how borders are forged - both in the land and in our imagination.

Sat 4th March

The BBC At War

Hailed and derided in equal measure, the BBC in 1939 had yet to seal its reputation. With the advent of war, the corporation found itself thrust into a battle against the Nazis, and the machinations of the British government. This series examines how the conflict transformed the BBC, what impact its broadcasts had at home and abroad, and uncovers the battles that raged with the government over its independence - out of which was forged the template for the modern BBC. From an early Nazi propaganda coup that forced the BBC into action and how fears of a crisis in morale at home led to class barriers being swept away on the airwaves, to how stubborn determination and technical improvisation enabled broadcasting from the heart of the war zone, we reveal how World War Two was the making of the BBC and nearly its breaking.

Sat 4th March

Time Team

The distinctive grass-covered remains of the deserted medieval village of Ulnaby are a landmark in the Durham countryside. And although they've been photographed, surveyed and written about, they've never been dug. But now Tony Robinson and the team have been invited to physically unearth the secrets of one of the best-preserved archaeological sites in Britain.

Sat 4th March

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Sat 4th March

In Search of Ancient Ireland

We begin with a look at the 'heroic age', before the advent of written communication. We succeed in separating fact from fiction in the timeless legends of mighty warriors like Cu Chullain and immortal rulers like Queen Maeve.

Sat 4th March

Noon

The Sixties

A provocative documentary series exploring the most transformative decade of the modern era in America.

Sat 4th March

Border Country

In this beautifully filmed series, historian Rory Stewart studies the extraordinary landscape, oral history and archaeology of the Anglo-Scottish border, finding parallels with frontiers from Turkey to Nepal. Two thousand years ago, the Romans dominated the world. They divided their northernmost territory with an arbitrary marker; Hadrian's Wall split the communities of Britain in two. Border Country explores the Anglo-Scottish borderlands tumultuous history, learning how this boundary defined the region. Having served as a diplomat in fiercely contested borderlands from Indonesia and the Balkans to Iraq and Afghanistan, Rory has witnessed the effect of artificial frontiers, and the destructive potential of new nationalisms. Drawing on this experience, Rory reveals how borders are forged - both in the land and in our imagination.

Sat 4th March

Sparks Of Invention

From the flashes of genius to the hard-won discoveries after many years of trial and error, this enlightening series explores the stories behind many of the inventions we take for granted today.

Sat 4th March

Evolution Of Evil

The vicious tyrant Francois 'Papa Doc' Duvalier ruthlessly dominated Haiti using violence and Voodoo. Rising from a humble country doctor, he made himself into a figure so terrifying to his people that many believed he had links with the Voodoo deity Baron Samedi, guardian of the graveyard. His private militia, the notorious Ton Ton Macoutes, became a byword for brutality, torturing and killing thousands of Haitians. He looted his country, stealing millions from some of the poorest people on earth.

Sat 4th March

Raising Pompeii

This film will tap into decades worth of research to tell us what life was really like for the people of Pompeii.

Sat 4th March

Tales of Irish Castles

We explore the great stories, legends and characters associated with the most beautiful, notorious and historical castles across Ireland. Presented by award winning actor Simon Delaney, the series takes in magnificent stone structures and the stories contained within their walls are brought to life through specially shot re-enactments, archive footage and contributions from Ireland's leading historians, archaeologists, castle owners and inhabitants.

Sat 4th March

Evening

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Sat 4th March

Blackbeard: Real Pirate of the Caribbean

This documentary utilises CSI archaeology to sift through concrete evidence and remains - reconstructing pirate life on land and at sea. Some of the 2000 artefacts found on Blackbeard's original ship come under investigation, as well as the remains of the village where he lived. High-tech ballistics and CGI fight simulation show the tactics and realities of sea battle. What is reputedly Blackbeard's actual skull is used for CAD facial reconstruction. This evolves into a complete reconstruction of the terrifying warrior image he created for himself: his infamous beard, the ribbons with which he twined it together and the fuses tucked into them to which he would set fire as he leapt aboard an enemy ship.

Sat 4th March

Barbarians Rising

Barbarian resistance escalates into a do or die confrontation with the Empire. The Germanic tribes unite for the first time under a single leader, Arminius, who engineers an ingenious ambush attack designed to drive Rome out of their homeland. The Empire needs to expand to survive and sets its sights on the barbarian stronghold of Britannia where the Celts fight back against the invasion with an unprecedented ferocity. Boudica becomes leader of the Iceni; when she and her daughters are brutally humiliated by the Empire, the warrior queen unleashes a murderous vengeance against the occupiers, uniting the Celtic clans in an uprising against Roman tyranny.

Sat 4th March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sat 4th March

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Sat 4th March

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 5th March

Morning

History's Greatest Hoaxes

This is one of the great hoax-or-not hoax stories; the best-selling book by Henry Charrierre, which told of his life on the Penal colony island of French Guiana was exposed as a novel, not a biography, by Gerrard de Villiers in 1970. But Charrierre refused to accept that he'd been rumbled and tried to get De Villiers's book Papillon Pinned banned, despite the very compelling proof facing him, not least that provided by other prisoners on the island. The historical sub plots to this fascinating episode are the harsh - some say inhuman - conditions on Devil's Island which gave birth to the book, fact or fiction, and the wider story of the penal colony system.

Sun 5th March

National Park: Secrets & Legends

In 1972, Eastern Airlines Flight 401 en route from New York to Miami crashes into Everglades National Park. One-hundred-and-one people are killed, and 77 others facing a living hell, trapped in the snake and alligator-infested swamp. When rescuers finally arrive, the pilot dies, and the co-pilot dies hours later in the hospital. Within months, the ghosts of these two men are sighted on other Eastern flights in a rash of hauntings that shake the airline down, with other crews refusing to fly on the planes. An investigation by the airline reveals that the haunted planes had parts salvaged from the wreck site in Everglades National Park. Once the parts are removed, the hauntings stop. The story leads viewers to wonder if the Park has a mysterious evil power. The next mystery is about the discovery of a murdered woman in an Everglades river in 1910. She is identified as an employee of an Everglades wealthy plantation owner, Edgar Watson. A local posse goes to his plantation and discovers dozens of human skeletons buried on the property. Watson isn't home, but when he turns up a week later he dies in a shootout with the posse. They determine that he has killed many of his workers for reasons no one can explain. Again the question is raised whether Everglades National Park has evil, transforming powers. Seventy years later, the Park draws another serial killer, Henry Lee Lucas, who confessed to killing as many as 600 people. Lucas says his murdering skills were honed in Everglades National Park by a Satanic cult called the Hand of Death. In a prison confession, Lucas says the Hand practised human sacrifice rituals on a remote island in the Park, and that he was accepted into their cult after slitting a man s throat. Though the Hand's secret base has never been discovered, Lucas says the Everglades is a place that breeds evil. That concept leads to the final story of the infestation of pythons in the Everglades, an invasive species that is killing almost all of it.

Sun 5th March

Great Mysteries and Myths

A documentary series for those who believe there can be nothing in the world more fascinating than the search for truth behind the most extraordinary mysteries and myths of the 20th century. A truly unique collection of stories shrouded in superstition and tragedy, this series brings to light a new perspective on these compelling and dark secrets.

Sun 5th March

Hangar 1: The UFO Files

This program reveals that President Ronald Reagan's personal encounters with UFOs may have been the driving force behind the Strategic Defense Initiative, a controversial programme that may have led to a top secret space weapons platform to protect us from attacks from space. Waves of UFO sightings across the world may, in fact, be evidence of a secret fleet of military UFOs that we've created. Has NASA and the US government been secretly building this program to protect us against alien and asteroid attacks? A look into MUFON's files suggests that these space weapons may already be in place.

Sun 5th March

Ancient Aliens

We uncover 75 million years of the most credible alien evidence on Earth, from the age of the dinosaurs, to ancient Egypt.

Sun 5th March

Blackbeard: Real Pirate of the Caribbean

This documentary utilises CSI archaeology to sift through concrete evidence and remains - reconstructing pirate life on land and at sea. Some of the 2000 artefacts found on Blackbeard's original ship come under investigation, as well as the remains of the village where he lived. High-tech ballistics and CGI fight simulation show the tactics and realities of sea battle. What is reputedly Blackbeard's actual skull is used for CAD facial reconstruction. This evolves into a complete reconstruction of the terrifying warrior image he created for himself: his infamous beard, the ribbons with which he twined it together and the fuses tucked into them to which he would set fire as he leapt aboard an enemy ship.

Sun 5th March

Barbarians Rising

Barbarian resistance escalates into a do or die confrontation with the Empire. The Germanic tribes unite for the first time under a single leader, Arminius, who engineers an ingenious ambush attack designed to drive Rome out of their homeland. The Empire needs to expand to survive and sets its sights on the barbarian stronghold of Britannia where the Celts fight back against the invasion with an unprecedented ferocity. Boudica becomes leader of the Iceni; when she and her daughters are brutally humiliated by the Empire, the warrior queen unleashes a murderous vengeance against the occupiers, uniting the Celtic clans in an uprising against Roman tyranny.

Sun 5th March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sun 5th March

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Sun 5th March

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 5th March

The Story of Egypt

In the first episode Prof Joann Fletcher is in search of the building blocks of the Egyptian civilisation. How did they progress, in just a few centuries, from primitive farmers to pyramid builders? To begin, Jo travels to Qurta in Upper Egypt, and almost 20,000 years back in time. Here she finds North Africa's earliest rock art, left by nomadic hunters. In Aswan, Jo visits one of the earliest settlements along the River Nile, to find the early signs of the Egyptians society. Then she discovers another of Egypt firsts, the first writing that was used to calculate taxes, and signifies the birth of the bureaucracy needed to build the pyramids. She also discovers how early royal burials became ever larger structures. She explores Egypt's first pyramid, the step pyramid in Sakkara which was one of the first stone structures on earth. Along her journey Joann meets some of the characters of Egypt's history, like Imhotep the King's architect who rose to be worshipped as a god. Finally Joann arrives at the Giza Pyramids, where she first sees the builders' village, built to house the people who made the pyramids, before venturing inside the greatest monument of them all - the Great Pyramid. Here she explains how Egypt had now reached its pinnacle; the ultimate society, creating one of the wonders of the ancient world but it couldn't last and disaster lay just around the corner.

Sun 5th March

Blackbeard: Real Pirate of the Caribbean

This documentary utilises CSI archaeology to sift through concrete evidence and remains - reconstructing pirate life on land and at sea. Some of the 2000 artefacts found on Blackbeard's original ship come under investigation, as well as the remains of the village where he lived. High-tech ballistics and CGI fight simulation show the tactics and realities of sea battle. What is reputedly Blackbeard's actual skull is used for CAD facial reconstruction. This evolves into a complete reconstruction of the terrifying warrior image he created for himself: his infamous beard, the ribbons with which he twined it together and the fuses tucked into them to which he would set fire as he leapt aboard an enemy ship.

Sun 5th March

Barbarians Rising

Barbarian resistance escalates into a do or die confrontation with the Empire. The Germanic tribes unite for the first time under a single leader, Arminius, who engineers an ingenious ambush attack designed to drive Rome out of their homeland. The Empire needs to expand to survive and sets its sights on the barbarian stronghold of Britannia where the Celts fight back against the invasion with an unprecedented ferocity. Boudica becomes leader of the Iceni; when she and her daughters are brutally humiliated by the Empire, the warrior queen unleashes a murderous vengeance against the occupiers, uniting the Celtic clans in an uprising against Roman tyranny.

Sun 5th March

Blood & Fury: America's Civil War

This series delves into one of the bloodiest chapters in American history. Told from a soldier's point-of-view, this program features the war's most significant battles: Bull Run, Antietam, Fredericksburg, Gettsyburg, Nashville, and Petersburg.

Sun 5th March

Noon

Evil Genius

For centuries, brilliant minds have changed and shaped the world. But when genius is used for evil, the results are some of the most twisted, inventive, and outrageous crimes in history. From bank heists and the take-down of a major airport, to breaking into a royal palace, these cold-blooded masterminds were born to out-smart the law.

Sun 5th March

Declassified: Stories of American Spies

Former CIA agents recall memories of service, detailing important cases, missions and operations.

Sun 5th March

Sparks Of Invention

From the flashes of genius to the hard-won discoveries after many years of trial and error, this enlightening series explores the stories behind many of the inventions we take for granted today.

Sun 5th March

The Civil War by Ken Burns

As the fighting worsens and the casualties grow in 1862, President Lincoln announces to the astonished Cabinet that after lengthy thought he has decided to emancipate the slaves.

Sun 5th March

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Sun 5th March

Grand Tours of the Scottish Islands

In this series, historian Paul Murton sets out to experience life on Scotland's magnificent islands. He uncovers the past and reveals its connections with the present, pointing to all that makes these islands quirky, surprising and beautiful.

Sun 5th March

Evening

Tony Robinson's Time Travels

The never-ending quest to satisfy humankind's senses has led to some magnificent culinary creations. But it's also caused great conflict - from the toppling of leaders to the creation of empires. In this episode Tony embarks on a gastronomic journey from the origins of the famous Pavlova dessert, to the discovery of one of the world's greatest wine regions. He time travels back to the early days of Australia's colonial settlement and learns how rum sparked a mutiny that brought down a government. A century later Tony finds out why something as common as beef caused one of the worst riots in Adelaide's history. He shows how a 17th-century corporate monster waged war across the globe, over the humble coffee bean and tea leaf. It's a remarkable a story of power, greed and corruption.

Sun 5th March

Empire of the Seas

Historian and sailor Dan Snow presents this program, examining the remarkable story of how Britain's greatest institution, her navy, has shaped her history. In The Golden Ocean, Snow charts the period from 1690 to 1759 and reveals how England, soon to be Britain, and her navy rose from the depths of military and economic disaster to achieve global supremacy. In 1690, France ruled the waves and the Royal Navy was in tatters. King William III had taken England into a disastrous war against the most powerful country in Europe. If England was to survive, it needed a new navy, one capable of carrying the fight to its enemies anywhere in the world. To achieve this would require a national effort unlike anything that had been seen before. King William III's determination to achieve mastery of the seas unleashed a chain reaction of revolutions in finance, industry and agriculture which reshaped the landscape and created the country's first great credit boom. Fifty years before the Industrial Revolution, the Royal Navy became the engine of global change, propelling Britain into the modern world. It had the desired effect at sea. By 1759, French forces around the world were capitulating to Britain's superior Navy. For the first time in her history, Britannia really did rule the waves.

Sun 5th March

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Sun 5th March

Coast Australia

Neil and the team embrace the rich colours and stories from where the desert meets the sea. Neil Oliver tries fishing with a pole and a line - and meets the pioneers who began the industry that made Port Lincoln rich. On the Spencer Gulf, distinguished scientist Professor Tim Flannery finds food to feed the world in a horticultural experiment powered by the sun and the sea. Brendan Moar champions the camel's role in Australian exploration at Port Augusta. Historian Alice Garner travels to the Copper Triangle to unearth the intriguing Cornish history associated with the precious metal mined there. Dean Miller joins the tuna Cowboys on a wet-ranch. Marine ecologist, Professor Emma Johnston has an intriguing visit to a whale-sized morgue.

Sun 5th March

Secrets of Great British Castles

The romantic appearance of castles across Britain belies their turbulent history as their walls are littered with the secrets of battles, sieges, intrigue and murder. Hosted by Dan Jones, this program brings you behind the scenes of Britain's greatest castles, and with dramatic stories and insightful interviews unravels the tales of the iconic fortifications and strongholds that are at the very core of British history. Filmed in stunning locations in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, each episode peels back the layers of six famous castles and from its foundation onwards, we discover its notorious inhabitants, infamous battles and the local communities that have shaped each fortress to stand as an iconic structure today. With a compelling narrative and prime-time production values boosted by computer graphics, aerial footage and dramatic reconstructions, this program is an important living history series that will inform, educate and entertain TV audiences across the world.

Sun 5th March

Treasures Decoded

Using forensic testing and experimental archaeology, the series unlocks secrets that have remained hidden for centuries. It sheds new light on moments in history that have long been shrouded in myth-making and controversy. Is the golden raft found in a remote Columbian cave the key to a legendary city of gold? Is the Turin Shroud the world's oldest photograph? Do we have the first piece of ancient scripture to mention a sexual relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene? Can we finally say whose face adorns the great Sphinx? This series takes viewers on a riveting journey of discovery and revelation.

Sun 5th March

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

Chris Tarrant discovers how a 4000km transcontinental railway was built against huge odds in just a few decades and turned a vast wilderness of isolated communities into the country we now know as Canada. Along the way, Chris drops a few bombs, searches for Winnie the Pooh, crosses raging rivers and explores one of the world's most formidable mountain ranges and the amazing engineering achievements that conquered them.

Mon 6th March

Morning

Tales of the Gun

During the 1920s and '30s in big cities and small towns a like, they earned a fierce reputation in a blaze of bullets. They were the best friends of criminals such as John Dillenger, Pretty Boy Floyd, Baby Face Nelson, Al Capone, and Bonnie and Clyde. Handle their Colt 45s and 38s, Tommy guns, Whippets and Browning automatic rifles.

Mon 6th March

Dogfights

Machine gun fire rips through the fuselage. Flames fill the cockpit and the aircraft plummets in a wild spin. But time and again the pilot of a P-47 Thunderbolt pulls out and keeps on fighting. Over occupied Europe, the P-47 Thunderbolt blazed a reputation as the most rugged fighter of WWII. Pilot Robert S. Johnson flies with the renowned 56th fighter group. His flight is jumped by 16 deadly Focke-Wulf 190s. As hundreds of enemy rounds impact his fighter, Johnson's life depends on the legendary protection his armoured cockpit affords. In June 1944, Lt. George Sutcliffe enters the fight of his life in an effort to escape 40-plus Me109s looming above him. The Thunderbolt's defensive capabilities inspired confidence in its pilots. But the aircraft was a dog-fighter at heart.

Mon 6th March

Secrets of War

They are the means by which to confuse an enemy, forcing him into making a fatal mistake. From decoy tanks and phony radio broadcasts, to the spy whose lies led Hitler to ruin, tools of deception can be the most deadly weapons of all. These are the methods of camouflage, fakery and propaganda used by both sides to influence the enemy and control the battlefield during WWII.

Mon 6th March

Time Team

The distinctive grass-covered remains of the deserted medieval village of Ulnaby are a landmark in the Durham countryside. And although they've been photographed, surveyed and written about, they've never been dug. But now Tony Robinson and the team have been invited to physically unearth the secrets of one of the best-preserved archaeological sites in Britain.

Mon 6th March

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Mon 6th March

Empire of the Seas

Historian and sailor Dan Snow presents this program, examining the remarkable story of how Britain's greatest institution, her navy, has shaped her history. In The Golden Ocean, Snow charts the period from 1690 to 1759 and reveals how England, soon to be Britain, and her navy rose from the depths of military and economic disaster to achieve global supremacy. In 1690, France ruled the waves and the Royal Navy was in tatters. King William III had taken England into a disastrous war against the most powerful country in Europe. If England was to survive, it needed a new navy, one capable of carrying the fight to its enemies anywhere in the world. To achieve this would require a national effort unlike anything that had been seen before. King William III's determination to achieve mastery of the seas unleashed a chain reaction of revolutions in finance, industry and agriculture which reshaped the landscape and created the country's first great credit boom. Fifty years before the Industrial Revolution, the Royal Navy became the engine of global change, propelling Britain into the modern world. It had the desired effect at sea. By 1759, French forces around the world were capitulating to Britain's superior Navy. For the first time in her history, Britannia really did rule the waves.

Mon 6th March

Secrets of Great British Castles

The romantic appearance of castles across Britain belies their turbulent history as their walls are littered with the secrets of battles, sieges, intrigue and murder. Hosted by Dan Jones, this program brings you behind the scenes of Britain's greatest castles, and with dramatic stories and insightful interviews unravels the tales of the iconic fortifications and strongholds that are at the very core of British history. Filmed in stunning locations in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, each episode peels back the layers of six famous castles and from its foundation onwards, we discover its notorious inhabitants, infamous battles and the local communities that have shaped each fortress to stand as an iconic structure today. With a compelling narrative and prime-time production values boosted by computer graphics, aerial footage and dramatic reconstructions, this program is an important living history series that will inform, educate and entertain TV audiences across the world.

Mon 6th March

Treasures Decoded

Using forensic testing and experimental archaeology, the series unlocks secrets that have remained hidden for centuries. It sheds new light on moments in history that have long been shrouded in myth-making and controversy. Is the golden raft found in a remote Columbian cave the key to a legendary city of gold? Is the Turin Shroud the world's oldest photograph? Do we have the first piece of ancient scripture to mention a sexual relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene? Can we finally say whose face adorns the great Sphinx? This series takes viewers on a riveting journey of discovery and revelation.

Mon 6th March

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

Chris Tarrant discovers how a 4000km transcontinental railway was built against huge odds in just a few decades and turned a vast wilderness of isolated communities into the country we now know as Canada. Along the way, Chris drops a few bombs, searches for Winnie the Pooh, crosses raging rivers and explores one of the world's most formidable mountain ranges and the amazing engineering achievements that conquered them.

Mon 6th March

The Civil War by Ken Burns

As the fighting worsens and the casualties grow in 1862, President Lincoln announces to the astonished Cabinet that after lengthy thought he has decided to emancipate the slaves.

Mon 6th March

Grand Tours of the Scottish Islands

In this series, historian Paul Murton sets out to experience life on Scotland's magnificent islands. He uncovers the past and reveals its connections with the present, pointing to all that makes these islands quirky, surprising and beautiful.

Mon 6th March

Tony Robinson's Time Travels

The never-ending quest to satisfy humankind's senses has led to some magnificent culinary creations. But it's also caused great conflict - from the toppling of leaders to the creation of empires. In this episode Tony embarks on a gastronomic journey from the origins of the famous Pavlova dessert, to the discovery of one of the world's greatest wine regions. He time travels back to the early days of Australia's colonial settlement and learns how rum sparked a mutiny that brought down a government. A century later Tony finds out why something as common as beef caused one of the worst riots in Adelaide's history. He shows how a 17th-century corporate monster waged war across the globe, over the humble coffee bean and tea leaf. It's a remarkable a story of power, greed and corruption.

Mon 6th March

Rome: Empire Without Limit

With a unique and personal voice, classicist and historian Mary Beard tells the story of the rise and fall of the Roman Empire.

Mon 6th March

Secrets of Great British Castles

The romantic appearance of castles across Britain belies their turbulent history as their walls are littered with the secrets of battles, sieges, intrigue and murder. Hosted by Dan Jones, this program brings you behind the scenes of Britain's greatest castles, and with dramatic stories and insightful interviews unravels the tales of the iconic fortifications and strongholds that are at the very core of British history. Filmed in stunning locations in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, each episode peels back the layers of six famous castles and from its foundation onwards, we discover its notorious inhabitants, infamous battles and the local communities that have shaped each fortress to stand as an iconic structure today. With a compelling narrative and prime-time production values boosted by computer graphics, aerial footage and dramatic reconstructions, this program is an important living history series that will inform, educate and entertain TV audiences across the world.

Mon 6th March

Noon

Treasures Decoded

Using forensic testing and experimental archaeology, the series unlocks secrets that have remained hidden for centuries. It sheds new light on moments in history that have long been shrouded in myth-making and controversy. Is the golden raft found in a remote Columbian cave the key to a legendary city of gold? Is the Turin Shroud the world's oldest photograph? Do we have the first piece of ancient scripture to mention a sexual relationship between Jesus and Mary Magdalene? Can we finally say whose face adorns the great Sphinx? This series takes viewers on a riveting journey of discovery and revelation.

Mon 6th March

Chris Tarrant Extreme Railways

Chris Tarrant discovers how a 4000km transcontinental railway was built against huge odds in just a few decades and turned a vast wilderness of isolated communities into the country we now know as Canada. Along the way, Chris drops a few bombs, searches for Winnie the Pooh, crosses raging rivers and explores one of the world's most formidable mountain ranges and the amazing engineering achievements that conquered them.

Mon 6th March

Tales of the Gun

His rifles and shotguns became famous in the hands of Buffalo Bill, Teddy Roosevelt and Annie Oakley. His machine guns saw action from World War I all they way through Vietnam. His pistols are among the most popular ever made. Meet John Moses Browning, born in Utah in 1855, who made his first gun at age 13 in his father's gun shop.

Mon 6th March

Dogfights

They were told they were racially inferior. They were told they lacked the intelligence to handle modern fighter aircraft. They were not supposed to succeed. But in the face of bigotry and ignorance the Tuskegee Airmen prevailed. With skill and bravery they squadron shattered racist stereotypes and their exploits became the stuff of legend. On July 18, 1944 pilots Wendell Pruitt and Lee Archer, the Gruesome Twosome, soar into battle over the Po river valley in Northern Italy. When German fighters attack the bomber stream they're tasked to protect Pruitt and Archer move to intercept. After a gruelling dogfight Archer manages to shoot down the German, his first victory. Elsewhere in the bomber stream, pilot Lucky Lester moves to engage a flight of four Me109s. After quickly dispatching the first 109 he nearly collides with the debris of the downed aeroplane. Then, he quickly downs two more. At the end of the day, the Tuskegee Airmen score 9 victories, their highest total for a single day yet. On August 24, 1944 pilot Charles McGee cruises towards Czechoslovakia. He and the rest of the Tuskegee Airmen are escorting bombers to an airfield in Pardubice. McGee spots an Fw190 trying to attack the bombers and quickly intercepts it. The 190 leads him on a wild chase across a burning airfield before he finally manages to knock it down. October 12, 1944: The Gruesome Twosome are back in action. While returning to base after an escort mission Pruitt, Archer, and the rest of the Tuskegee Airmen encounter a huge formation of German aircraft. The skies explode, machine guns chatter, engines roar. In the frantic action Archer manages to down 3 aircraft bringing his war total to five. The Tuskegee Airmen now have an ace. March 24, 1945: The Tuskegee Airmen escort a bomber stream to Berlin. Pilot Roscoe Brown is among them. Just south of Berlin the Germans send Me262s- a jet fighter to attack the Americans. The Tuskegee Airmen manage to down 3 of the 262s- an incredible achievement.

Mon 6th March

National Trust: National Treasures

Treasures of the Trust is a celebration of some of the finest National Trust properties from across Britain and Northern Ireland. Each program brings to life an individual property, featuring the stories of the people who built it, who added to it, and who collected the treasures within. With beautiful photography and lavish attention to detail, the series also re-tells stories of historic intrigue and hauntings.

Mon 6th March

Time Team

When the new owners of a house in Blythburgh in Suffolk explored their potting shed, they were shocked to discover a cupboard full of human skulls. Could these remains have something to do with what's lurking among the shrubs and trees - the superb ruins of a medieval priory that has lain hidden for years?